Category old

Christmas concluded, what to do with the 500,000 purposeless fir trees? “Less Than a Viking Funeral,” said a headline on an article by Gay Talese on Jan. 6., 1960. He wrote that some might be burned like this batch in Whitestone, Queens; others, less ceremoniously, taken “to one of the city’s eight dumping areas,” two each in the Bronx, Brooklyn, Queens and Staten Island. “Within twenty years, said Paul R. Screvane, the Sanitation Commissioner, there will be no more room in the city to bury the...

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“Mrs. Marshall Field with the pelt of a jaguar.” An article published Sept. 15, 1926, recounted Mrs. Field’s three months in Brazil, financed by her husband. The expedition was headed by George K. Cherrie, an ornithologist at the Field Museum in Chicago, who accompanied President Theodore Roosevelt on his 1913-14 voyage down the River of Doubt. There is a related post on the Lens blog. Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1920s, #1926, #marshall_field, #brazil, #george_cherrie, #roosevelt, #chicago, #leopard

Nov. 28, 1923: Liquor and beers were examined by J. W. Quillen, the Bureau of Internal Revenue’s chief chemist, who determined that only two of the thousands of bottles in this warehouse weren’t terrible moonshine counterfeits. Three years later, Mr. Quillen was quoted in The New York Times warning against future deaths from poisonous alcohol. At the time, the government had taken up the practice of denaturing alcohol in order to prevent its being bootlegged. Nevertheless, bootleggers sought to...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1920s, #irs, #alcohol, #bootleg

A vehicle is unloaded from a ship moored in a Brooklyn pier, but there was little shipping news in the paper of Friday, July 13, 1951. What news there was included a notice reporting a shrinkage of the United States’ “dry” population, which noted that New York led in total beer consumption, but was sixth in per capita consumption. Another brief noted that the Russian premier Joseph Stalin had received an African lion as a “present from a South African admirer.” And for those fretting about what...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1950s

Oct. 29, 1954: A visit by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother to New York included being whisked to the 102nd floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. She charmed her American guides, chatting with them amiably and was “nearly mobbed” as she left the building. “How the crowds knew she was in the building was something of a mystery,” The Times reported. “Her decision to make a visit was not made until noon.” People thronged for a glimpse of royalty, even if it meant playing hooky and wai...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1950s, #1954, #queen_mother, #queen_elizabeth, #empire_state_building

talented10th:Stephen Somerstein/New York Historical Society “Things Go Better With Coke” sign and multi-generational family watching marchers, 1965.

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From the the Mid-Week Pictorial, a nabbing of smugglers, dated July 16, 1925. The caption: “Camouflage that failed: Schooner Nantisco at the Army Base, Brooklyn, after capture by revenue agents, who discovered 3,000 cases of liquor concealed under a load of lumber.” Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1920s, #schooner, #nantisco, #army_base, #liquor, #prohibition, #wisky, #1925

Aug. 9, 1960: Tom Morton of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals took the vital signs of a female indigo snake, which surprised the Manhattan furrier Hercules Cheropoulos one morning as he arrived at work. The snake was determined to be about five years old, three inches thick at its widest and five and a half feet long, but “how it got into the 62-year-old furrier’s shop remained a mystery.” Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1960s

Dozens of visitors frolic in the water as seen through a palm frond in Acapulco, Mexico, 1964.Photograph by Thomas Nebbia, National Geographic Creative

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#mexico, #vintage, #natgeo, #1960s, #history, #nebbia

Thomas Hoepker: Downtown Manhattan with World Trade Center towers, seen from “lover’s lane” in New Jersey. New Jersey, 1983.

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#thomas_hoepker, #1980s, #1983, #manhattan, #new_york, #new_jersey, #nyc, #world_trade_center, #lovers, #couples, #cars, #city, #colour, #horizontal, #no_offence_but_im_happy

Nov. 25, 1977: A statistic cited in the article with this photo noted that 150,000 people were treated in 1976 for injuries associated with toys. The article also gave a New Jersey number for calling Santa and offered wisdom such as wearing layers in cold weather and not skating at night. The caption identified Santa as heading toward the Garden State Plaza in Paramus, where the parking lot was already packed with automobiles of Christmas shoppers. Photo: D. Gorton/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1970s, #1977, #santa, #garden_state_plaza, #paramus, #mall, #christmas_shopping, #toys, #parking_lot

Children of coal miners play near a fire-prone wooden house in Siberia, September 1988.Photograph by Steve Raymer, National Geographic

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#siberia, #russia, #1980s, #raymer, #natgeo, #vintage, #history

Sept. 17, 1986: Perhaps sensing the decades of disappointment and loss to come, Mets players remained on the mound, relishing a victory over the Chicago Cubs to win the championship of the National League East. Photo: Keith Meyers/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1980s, #1986, #mets, #chicago_cubs, #baseball, #victory

Jan. 10, 1977: Dorothy Hamil, Olympic gold medalist, rehearsed for the year’s Ice Capades at Madison Square Garden, which received a mixed review from The Times. “Dorothy Hamill’s first number,” wrote Richard Eder, “was ice skating with no adornment other than itself. As she surged around, impaling and corkscrewing on her own movements, it was like one clear voice coming out of a tumult.“ Photo: Tyrone Dukes/The New York Times

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#ice_skating, #olympic_games, #madison_square_garden, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1977, #1970s, #ice_capades, #dorothy_hamill

Herb Ritts: Versace Dress, Back View, El Mirage, 1990 This masterpiece of fashion photography unites several of Ritts’s favorite elements: architectonic shapes, unusual adjacencies, and warm light. To create the black tunnel-like shape that surrounds the model, Ritts hung a tarp on a large metal frame and used wind machines to blow it out. The contrast between the matte dress fabric and the slightly reflective sheen of model Christy Turlington’s skin gives the nude areas dimension.

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#herb_ritts, #1990s, #1990, #fashion, #dress, #versace, #iconic, #text, #this_is_gorgeous, #el_mirage, #california, #vertical, #favourite

Oct. 24, 1949: Crowds gathered on 42nd Street to witness an outdoor meeting of the United Nations General Assembly as the cornerstone of the East River building was laid. President Harry S. Truman sat next to Gov. Thomas Dewey and announced that “ever since the first atomic weapon was developed, a major objective of United States policy has been a system of international control of atomic energy that would assure effective prohibition of atomic weapons.” “The three-and-a-half-ton conrnerstone, c...

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#international_relations, #nuclear_weapons, #united_nations, #harry_truman, #general_assembly, #east_river, #france, #new_hampshire, #russia, #united_states, #black_and_wh

Jan. 22, 1958: New York’s famous skyline was greatly reduced by fog that was part of a storm that disrupted air, sea and automobile traffic, brought the city’s reservoirs to 85 percent capacity and flooded Westchester basements. The Times reported that flights were rerouted, a boat ran aground, a motorist was killed and there was snow in the Midwest. Photo: Arthur Brower/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1950s, #1958, #fog, #aerial_photography, #new_york_skyline, #clouds

A German shepherd is accepted for sentry duty by the Coast Guard, January 1941.Photograph by J. Baylor Roberts, National Geographic

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#natgeo, #photography, #dogs, #roberts, #military, #german_shepherd

A young woman admires flowers in a Baden garden in Germany, June 1928.Photograph by Wilhelm Tobien, National Geographic

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#germany, #autochrome, #natgeo, #fashion, #1920s, #vintage, #tobien

May 11, 1942: Five months into World War II, a young Coast Guardsman from Iowa was shown in a photo feature exhibiting the “typical actions and reactions of the thousands of service men from small towns who, since the war began, have made their maiden journey to the ‘big city.’” Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1940s

A close view of a male lion photographed with a flashlight at night in Africa, May 1910.Photograph by A. Dugmore, National Geographic

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#africa, #lions, #1910s, #black_and_white, #natgeo, #dugmore, #photography

July 20, 2010

A grouper is examined by three kittens at Marineland in Florida, 1938.Photograph by Luis Marden, National Geographic

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#photography, #kittens, #natgeo, #1930s

May 14, 1935: The American yacht Yankee, towed into Gosport, in southern England, to compete in the America’s Cup (which is an international award named for a schooner named America, which raced around the Isle of Wight and earned the inaugural trophy in 1851). After months of fervent speculation and drama, the Yankee had a mixed record,  often bested by the Endeavour and the Astra, before being scrapped in 1941. Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1930s, #1935, #yankee, #yacht, #gosport, #england, #isle_of_wight, #yacht_race

Sept. 18, 1926: Mayor John V. Lindsay of New York smashed a bottle of mineral water for good luck on the propeller of a plane bound for Paris by René Fonck, an aviation hero of World War I. The plane crashed during takeoff, killing two crew members. The first nonstop transatlantic flight would be successfully achieved the following year by Charles A. Lindbergh. Photo: The New York Times

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#aviation_accidents, #safety_and_disasters, #airlines_and_airplanes, #charles_lindbergh, #john_lindsay, #paris, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_ne

On Oct. 23, 1962, President John F. Kennedy signed the Proclamation for Interdiction of the Delivery of Offensive Weapons to Cuba, or the Cuba Quarantine, in the midst of the scariest 13 days of the cold war. With a letter from the Soviet premier, Nikita Khrushchev, the next day warning that the blockade constituted an act of aggression, the crisis seemed to escalate. After invocations of mutual assured destruction, secret deals, a downed U-2 spy plane and more, the crisis was averted on Oct. 28...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1960s, #1962, #john_f_kennedy, #jfk, #nikita_khrushchev, #cuba, #soviet_union, #u_2, #spy_plane, #cold_war

Dec. 5, 1976: Not only did Wise Philip, a horse that had never run a stakes race, win an upset at Aqueduct Racetrack in the $54,100 Discovery Handicap, but New York Times photographer Barton Silverman also won the New York Racing Association’s photo competition. It was not so much a photo finish in the proverbial sense; Times photographers swept the first three prizes. Photo: Barton Silverman/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1970s, #1976, #wise_philip, #aqueduct_racetrack, #discovery_handicap, #new_york_racing_association

February 21, 2010 Marilyn Monroe

Two balls dropped from the tower in Pisa replay Galileo’s experiment, November 1974.Photograph by Luis Marden, National Geographic

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#marden, #1970s, #natgeo, #photography, #vintage, #italy, #history

May 2, 1946: On its annual visit to Bellevue Hospital in Manhattan, the Ringling Brothers and Barnum & Bailey Circus drew record-breaking crowds — a “throng of 6,000, including outgoing patients, and more than a generous sprinkling of neighborhood youngsters” The Times reported. “For many, it was their first circus,” The Times explained, “such as tiny Oscar Turner, 5, wrapped in a pink bathrobe several sizes too large, who gave his nurse a most busy time. Oscar kept up a frequent charge to t...

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#elephants, #circuses, #manhattan, #ringling_bros_and_barnum_bailey_circus, #bellevue_hospital_center, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york

Londoners seek shelter during WWII in the Aldwych tube station, April 1941.Photograph by Acme News Pictures, Inc.

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#london, #1940s, #black_and_white, #history, #vintage

April 5, 1946: This image of the catacombs of the Metropolitan Museum of Art accompanied a letter to the editor published Dec. 7, 1970, that pointed out, citing a fact sheet issued by the museum, that “90 percent of the American paintings and sculptures, 55 percent of the objects assigned to the American wing, 55 percent of the European paintings and 70 percent of Western European art are not on view.” The writer suggests several alternative means to display hidden art. Photo: The New York Times...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1940s, #1946, #metropolitan_museum_of_art, #paintings, #catacombs, #met, #new_york

Nov. 11, 1956: The police convened at Mount Neboh Temple on West 79th Street for an annual memorial service for officers who had died. Police Commissioner Stephen P. Kennedy noted the occasion with a call for reduced traffic deaths. “While, tragically, the nationwide death toll continues to mount, here in New York City we have been able to reduce vehicular deaths,” he said. “Yet our death, injury and accident toll is still too high.“ Photo: Eddie Hausner/The New York Times

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#traffic_accidents_and_safety, #deaths, #funerals_and_memorials, #police_department, #new_york_city, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_tim

March 13, 2010 via Becky.
December 11, 2014