Category old

July 26,1964: At the Ciudad Libertad, a military base turned school center, Fidel Castro delivered a lecture on “the virtues of agriculture and the evils of bureaucracy.” A profile in The Times Magazine documented Mr. Castro’s restlessness and unpredictability as a leader, noting his eating habits, his preferences in décor and the iron-fisted grip on power he enjoyed. “If Mr. Castro’s suggestion that he would like to explore a settlement with the United States is ever taken up,” Richard Eder wro...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1960s, #castro, #cuba

March 30, 1957: Former President Harry S. Truman arrived at Pennsylvania Station for a visit to his pregnant daughter and his son-in-law, only to be harped at by reporters asking about “strained relations” between him and the sitting president, Dwight D. Eisenhower. “I just don’t give a damn,” Mr. Truman was quoted in The Times, which also noted that his topcoat was three years old and that his wife, Bess Truman, left, wore blue. Meanwhile, on the front page that day, The Times reported on newsp...

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#dwight_d_eisenhower, #harry_truman, #bess_truman, #pennsylvania_station, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1957, #1950s, #speeding

A giant Olmec head discovered in 1946 gets a patch, San Lorenzo, Mexico.Photograph by Richard Hewitt Stewart, National Geographic

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#mexico, #natgeo, #black_and_white, #history, #1940s, #archaeology

July 27, 1957: After three weeks on display at Grand Central Terminal, a 63-foot-tall ballistic missile was taken down and shipped back from whence it came — the Chrysler Corporation in Detroit, the primary contractor in making the missile. “The Redstone, classed by the Army as a medium-range missile, is a supersonic ground-to-ground weapon believed to be capable of delivering an atomic punch more than 200 miles,” reported The Times when it went up. Photo:

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1950s, #grand_central_terminal, #ballistic_missile, #chrysler_corporation, #redstone, #cold_war, #arms_race, #nuclear_w

Feb. 27, 1924: The French actress Cécile Sorel, dwarfed by the “massive, woman-headed, lion-bodied mystery of the ages,” the Sphinx in Egypt. Ms. Sorel, like the enigmatic sphinx, was a source of fascination, if headlines in The Times are to go by, from her feelings on movies to a successful suit against a plastic surgeon who left her unable to close her eyes — resulting in “a fishlike stare.” That notice, for the record, appeared on the front page, alongside headlines like “421 Listed As Dead i...

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#egypt, #ethiopia, #france, #italy, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #cecile_sorel, #silent_movie_stars, #sphinx, #fishlike_stares, #b

Parrots perch in tree branches and on arms and shoulders of visitors in Miami, November 1950.Photograph by Willard Culver, National Geographic

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#vintage, #1950s, #natgeo, #photography, #florida

Travelers look at a glass dome on a stainless-steel train car, April 1947Photograph by Willard Culver, National Geographic

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#natgeo, #photography, #trains, #1940s, #travel, #april

March 23, 2010 via Nora Cross.
May 15, 2010 via adski_kafeteri.

Jan. 22, 1966: Chinese New Year celebrations in Manhattan, which was the Year of the Horse. At a hotel, the Roosevelt Raceway recognized the event with an award created for the occasion, which was given to racer Dick Thomas. “A porcelain horse, reputed to be from the collection of Mott and Pell, was presented to Thomas, who was prevailed upon to say, ‘Gung hay fat choy.’ What did he say? Happy New Year!” reported The Times. “For those twin-double horse fans, who seek omens in almost everything,...

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#new_year, #horses, #lunar_new_year, #manhattan, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1966, #1960s, #chinatown, #chinese_new_year

Sept. 25, 1968: A Times report lamented that the youngsters weren’t taken out of school for a month each year to go pick the apple crop anymore, or that farm owners’ sons didn’t want to inherit the family farm and that, “Like other villages through the apple country of the Hudson Valley, Red Hook is becoming suburban.” But, its politics were still conservative Republican: A local office-seeker wanted to warn of the dangers of George Wallace, so he told “a racist joke that he said Governor Wallac...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1960s, #1968, #apple_picking, #farm, #hudson_valley

March 11, 2010 via Henry.

May 23, 1957: Two suspects picked up at Grand Central Station and taken to 161 East 35th Street police station on this day had a .45 caliber automatic, a .38 Smith and Wesson, a pillow case, gloves, bullets, fake nose-and-glasses and adhesive tape confiscated from them. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1950s, #1957, #grand_central, #smith_and_wesson, #guns, #fake_nose, #robbery, #crime, #new_york, #police

March 6, 1966: A picture showing a tree-lined road leading north from Lisbon to the Portuguese village of Alcobaca accompanied an article by Robert Deardorff, who undertook to live in Europe for some time as a tourist observing the act of tourism. “I think tourists should be expected to know something about the countries they intend to visit,” he wrote in a two-part series, adding, “I think that travel should be made harder, too, so that individuals would have more fun, and their own fun, instea...

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#travel_and_vacations, #lisbon, #europe, #portugal, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1966, #1960s, #tourism, #tourists

1964: Flamenco at Club 169 on Allen Street, which, as described by The Times, was a “onetime speakeasy on the lower East Side,” and which was on a mission to combat “juvenile delinquency,” limiting its membership to those from ages 16 to 21. “The hardest drink in the house,” read a caption to another photo, “is a 15-cent root beer.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

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#juvenile_delinquency, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #flamenco, #dance, #lower_east_side, #15_cent_root_beer, #1964, #1960s

Aug. 19, 1949: “Coming in on the Wing.” Gannets on Bonaventure Island, on the north shore of the Gaspe Peninsula in Canada. This photograph, which was published in The Times in February 1950, won first prize in the pictorial class in the 14th annual Photo Exhibit of the Press Photographers Association of New York. Gov. Thomas E. Dewey presented the awards. More bird photos here. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1950s, #1940s, #birds, #bonaventure_island, #press_photographers_association, #canada

Jan. 29, 1992: Central Park’s beloved polar bear duo, Ida, left, and Gus — who was later famous for being neurotic, swimming in his pool 12 hours a day out of boredom. In 2011, Ida, Gus’s companion of 24 years, was euthanized after a bout with a painful liver disease. Zookeepers were fearful that Gus would soon succumb to grief, but he died in 2013, at the age of 27. (According to The Times, the median life span for a male polar bear in captivity is 20.7 years.) Photo: Suzanne DeChillo/The New Y...

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#polar_bears, #central_park, #liver, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #gus, #ida, #neuroses, #zoos, #zookeepers, #central_park_zoo, #po

Jan. 2, 1953: A busless Fifth Avenue as a bus strike entered its second day, and it would continue until Jan. 29, the “biggest bus strike in the city’s history.” A 3 a.m. breakthrough in the negotiations was ushered by Theodore Kheel, identified as a “former impartial adviser in the transit industry” who, it was reported, had flown from the Bahamas to work on a deal. Photo: Ernie Sisto/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1950s, #1953, #fifth_avenue, #new_york

March 9, 1955: A photo essay published in The Times shared the exploits of the Atka, a 6,500-ton Navy icebreaker that surveyed parts of Antarctica in preparation of a larger survey of the “terra incognita,” as the continent was dubbed by The Times. “It is a land utterly foreign to most men’s experience. It is inhospitable, unpredictable, a region of unknown dangers.” The expedition was spent making more precise measurements of Antarctica’s contours, shown here, as well as encountering seals, fig...

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#antarctic_regions, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #scientific_exploration, #walter_sullivan, #terra_incognita, #penny_the_puppy

ahiddengardenofsecrets: They are unforgettable, these girls…. Ziegfeld Girl http://allaboutthepast.tumblr.com/

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#old

Feb. 14, 1940: Workers at La Guardia Airport fought the elements to hold down a plane as a large storm brought seven inches of snow and winds gusting at 60 miles per hour to New York, hammering the eastern part of the country. Bus services were suspended and a swath of the West Side Highway closed, but the city seemed to prevail in “what appeared to be a winning effort to keep essential services functioning.” Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1940s, #1940, #la_guardia_airport, #snow_storm, #blizzard

A baseball player slides into home base while an umpire calls safe, August 1919.Photograph by Paul Thompson, National Geographic

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#history, #black_and_white, #natgeo, #1910s, #photography, #vintage, #sports

From the Mid-Week Pictorial: Marian Holmes knelt inside the glass of a 100,000-watt incandescent bulb to be exhibited by the Westinghouse Company at the World Fair in Chicago. She held a 60-watt bulb for comparison. The caption noted that the bulb “must be strong enough to withstand a crushing strain of 40,000 pounds.” Aug. 4, 1934. Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1930s, #marian_holmes, #westinghouse, #worlds_fair, #chicago, #light_bulb

Nov. 4, 1931: Maj. John W. Hession won the Metropolitan 1,000-Yard Rifle Championship for the second time, with a perfect score of 100 plus 24 for tie shots on the State Rifle Range in Peekskill, N.Y. Major Hession, pictured here with medals he won in competition, was a member of nine United States rifle teams and was also an advocate. He wrote to the editor in 1942, “Nothing will give our gunners a better idea how to hit instinctively a moving target than shooting at clay pigeons from a trap.”...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1930s, #1931, #john_w_hession, #rifle, #target, #peekskill, #united_states_rifle_team, #shooting

March 29, 1925: The crew of the U.S.S. Wyoming enjoyed several species of mascot to cheer them on their naval maneuvers: “a dog, a parrot, a monkey, a marmoset, a kitten and other strange beasts.” Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1920s, #1925, #uss_wyoming, #naval_ship, #navy, #monkey

February 2, 2010

Nov. 16, 1966: As the Viennese Opera Ball loomed, Liselotte Waldheim — daughter of the Austrian ambassador — and a dancing partner were on hand to demonstrate the Viennese waltz, lest the young couples invited to the annual event, which benefited cancer research, be unprepared. “The session lasted about three hours,” The Times reported, “But all work and no play can make for unhappy waltz partners.” So goulash and soft drinks were served during an intermission. “We had hard drinks prepared,” Ms....

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#austria, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #viennese_opera, #viennese_waltz, #dancing_steps, #goulash, #soft_drinks, #1966, #1960s

Feb. 24, 1960: At the Art Model Studios in Mount Vernon, N.Y., where men would spend their days “‘just sittin’ around’ whittling — and get paid for it.” An article went on to describe a merry band of obsessive perfectionists who made model boats, mostly ocean liners, for ship companies and museums, spending hundreds of hours and using tools like tweezers to build “a precise fractional scale of the actual ship,” down to the “life preservers that would be tight on an ant.” Photo: Robert Walker/The...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1960s

Sailors wearing raingear sit in a sailboat’s cockpit awaiting dawn in the West Indies, October 1966.Photograph by Winfield Parks, National Geographic

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#natgeo, #1960s, #parks, #history, #vintage, #sailing

Jan. 20, 1994: “Time Out From a Higher Calling,” read a title on this photograph alongside a story about a group of East Harlem nuns originally from France. Sister Marie Chantal, leaping, and Sister Marie Francesca worked out at the Tae Kwon Do Academy at 828 Ninth Avenue. “The fact that we know tae kwon do doesn’t change anything,” Mother Marie Martha, the group’s mother superior told David Gonzalez, the reporter. “It’s just a sport.”Photo:...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1990s, #nuns, #tae_kwon_do, #mother_superior, #east_harlem, #sister, #9th_avenue, #sr_maria_chantal, #sr_maria_frances

Herb Ritts: Versace Dress, Back View, El Mirage, 1990 This masterpiece of fashion photography unites several of Ritts’s favorite elements: architectonic shapes, unusual adjacencies, and warm light. To create the black tunnel-like shape that surrounds the model, Ritts hung a tarp on a large metal frame and used wind machines to blow it out. The contrast between the matte dress fabric and the slightly reflective sheen of model Christy Turlington’s skin gives the nude areas dimension.

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#herb_ritts, #1990s, #1990, #fashion, #dress, #versace, #iconic, #text, #this_is_gorgeous, #el_mirage, #california, #vertical, #favourite

September 12, 2014 Saul Leiter: Festival, 1954