Category old

An article dated Sept. 10, 1966, presented a sort of primer in Long Island surfing, where the waves did not impress: “The waves came in quietly, small and docile like the blunt-horn heifers aspiring bullfighters use for practice.” Surfers demonstrated various moves for the annual championships, such as the “the crossed-leg weave,” the “Watusi swing” or the “unrehearsed dip.” Photo: Ernie Sisto/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1960s, #1965, #long_island, #surfing, #watusi_swing, #surfers, #waves

Feb. 17, 1947: Not a tea party in any current sense of the phrase but a stately tea ritual: The United States Board of Tea Experts assembled for the first time since 1942 “to set up minimum standards for the eight to ten different types of tea that will be coming into the country” the following year. “With much solemn sniffing and sipping,” the seven-member board sought to assess the quality of imports and thus ensure “the reputation of the world’s favorite beverage (next to water) suffers no bl...

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#tea, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1947, #1940s, #united_states_board_of_tea_experts, #tea_parties, #tea_meetings, #worlds_fav

The heat of July 1954 did not stop these intrepid tourists from making a go of it in the city. In the days leading to July 21, when the photo was taken, food crops had been destroyed, storms had killed 10 and an eclipse was obscured by clouds in Ontario. And in Brooklyn, at a mobile animal clinic for checkups, neighborhood pets were affected, too. Reported The Times: “These dog days shouldn’t happen to a dog. Especially a fat dog, and there are a lot of those.” Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Ti...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1950s

Jan. 31, 1933: President Franklin D. Roosevelt was presented with an 80-pound cake on the occasion of his birthday, which he celebrated at the Meriwether Inn before several members of the Warm Springs Foundation, a center devoted to disabled people in Warm Springs, Ga. “You may think that there is only one surgeon here,” the president said, “but I am going to show you that there are two,” and with that he went at the cake with a knife. The news shared the front page of The New York Times with a...

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#birthdays, #franklin_roosevelt, #adolf_hitler, #georgia, #germany, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1933, #1930s, #pound_cake

onlyoldphotography: Berenice Abbott: James Joyce, 1928 This was one of her most moving portraits. The grey, strangely lifeless, enveloping light finds its way everywhere, describing without emphasis or favor the writer’s stickpin, his hands, his right ear, his fine beaver hat, the deep tiredness of his elegant slouch. He seems the survivor of too difficult a battle, shell-shocked by the terrible labor of putting so many words in the precisely proper order.

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#re_uploaded_in_better_quality

Aug. 15, 1963: Not unlike the sky cowboys of nearly 50 years later, in advance of the 1964 World’s Fair in Queens, the “sky is full of daredevil iron workers, swinging from huge cranes, performing feats of derring do as they put the huge Unisphere together.” Photo: Patrick Burns/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1960s, #1963, #worlds_fair, #queens, #new_york, #unisphere

April 4, 1968: News of the Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.’s assassination instigated “sporadic violence” in Brooklyn and Harlem, according to The Times. Angry shouting, roaming “gangs of youth,” rock throwing and some looting characterized much of the night. “In contrast to these disturbances, a group of about 50 persons, most of them youths, began a silent march and vigil,” The Times reported. “It was organized spontaneously,” one marcher said. Photo: Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times

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#assassinations_and_attempted_assassinations, #martin_king, #brooklyn, #harlem, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1968, #1960s, #mar

March 15, 1932: A Los Angeles alligator farm owner evidently took his gator, Billy, to testify in lawsuit involving the University of Florida and its mascot and the misuse of the mascot, and did him proud: “This Silent Witness Was Eloquent.” Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1930s

Rodney Smith: Danielle in Boat, Beaufort, SC, 1996 “…it was a seventeen thousand dollar evening dress and we put her in this boat with alligators and it was amazing.”

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#rodney_smith, #1990s, #1996, #beaufort, #south_carolina, #fashion, #boat, #model

April 21, 2010 Alfred Hitchcock

Summer strollers watch a colorful water fountain display at night, Chicago, May 1931.Photograph by Clifton R. Adams, National Geographic

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#chicago, #history, #adams, #1930s, #natgeo, #vintage

April 27, 1964: President Lyndon B. Johnson picking up one of his two beagles — named Him and Her — by the ears, prompting outrage and a defensive president, insisting that they enjoyed it. “It’s good for him,” said President Johnson. “And if you’ve ever followed dogs, you like to hear them yelp.” John Neff, executive vice president of the American Kennel Club, told The Times, “I’ve never heard it said that this is good for beagles.” Photo: The New York Times

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#appointments_and_executive_changes, #dogs, #lyndon_johnson, #american_kennel_club, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1964, #1960s

Jan. 17, 1960: Einar Dohlen, a ski jumper from Norway, recently a senior at the University of New Hampshire, leading competitors to the top of a jump at Bear Mountain, N.Y. Mr. Dohlen was the champion that year, beating out Thor Franzen of Norway in front of a record crowd of 33,100. Photo: Ernie Sisto/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1960s, #1960, #einar_dohlen, #university_of_new_hampshire, #bear_mountain, #ski_jumper, #thor_franzen, #norway

Sheik Jacob Boukhari poses for a photograph in Jerusalem, December 1927.Photograph by Maynard Owen Williams, National Geographic

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#autochrome, #vintage, #1920s, #natgeo, #photography

June 5, 1935: A parachutist only 160 feet aloft before attempting a test “of the rapidity of a parachute’s opening” near Vincennes, France. Sadly, as there is no mention in the photo’s caption affixed to the back, the test’s result is a matter of conjecture. Photo: The New York Times

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#parachutes_and_parachute_jumping, #france, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1935, #1930s, #vincennes

A “drugstore cowboy” preparing to deliver orders on his bicycle in Texas, 1938.Photograph by Luis Marden, National Geographic

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#history, #black_and_white, #1930s, #marden, #natgeo, #photography

Researchers prepare for a flight in the stratosphere balloon in South Dakota, 1935.Photograph by Richard Hewitt Stewart, National Geographic

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#black_and_white, #history, #natgeo, #1930s, #stewart, #aviation

Oct. 4, 1949: How better to sell the government’s debt than with multitudes of the smiling visage of President Harry S. Truman? Such was the thinking in 1949, when a group of “the country’s top cartoonists and comic-strip artists” was assembled to accompany a traveling exhibit of their work to help sell government bonds. Before the tour began, reported The Times, they gathered in the Rose Garden to meet with the president, face to faces. Photo: Bruce Hoertel/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1940s, #1949, #truman, #president

April 28, 1934: In Philadelphia, Jack Wolff of Manhattan College finished the one-mile relay at the Penn Relay Carnival with a time of 3 minutes 16 seconds. “They went out with grim determination,” reported Arthur J. Daley, “each of the four white-jerseyed youngsters running the race of his life.” Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1930s, #1934, #jack_wolff, #manhattan_college, #penn_relays, #philadelphia, #track_and_field

A man balances a piece of pumice rock on his legs in Katmai National Park and Preserve, Alaska, September 1921.Photograph by Lucius G. Folsom, National Geographic

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#alaska, #black_and_white, #1920s, #folsom, #natgeo, #history, #vintage

July 20, 1955: The assembly line at the Ford Motor Company’s new plant in Mahwah, N.J., during the first week it was open. The plant promised to produce as many as 800 cars and 250 trucks in a one-shift day, reported The Times, replacing a Ford plant in Edgewater, N.J., which on the day of the Mahwah opening rolled out its 1,817,938th and last vehicle. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #mahwah, #ford, #edgewater, #factory, #1950s, #cars, #trucks

Neon signs blur the night scene as marines walk on the street in San Diego, California, July 1969.Photograph by James L. Amos, National Geographic

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#california, #vintage, #1960s, #amos, #natgeo, #history, #photography

May 17, 1982: First Lady Nancy Reagan flashed a wide smile en route to the world premiere of “Annie,” the film adaption of the “popular but not exactly classic example of Broadway schmaltz-and-hoofery,” at Radio City Music Hall. The music hall itself made an appearance in the film, which the film’s reviewer found fitting: “ ‘Annie’ is a nearly perfect Music Hall picture. It’s big, colorful, slightly vulgar, occasionally boring and full of talent not always used to its limits. It’s a movie in pra...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times

June 1, 2010 via adski_kafeteri.

April 7, 1946: The caption for this unpublished photograph, taken at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, simply, yet aptly, read, “catacombs of art.” Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1940s, #1946, #metropolitan_museum_of_art, #met, #catacomb, #sculputre, #art_storage

Parrots perch in tree branches and on arms and shoulders of visitors in Miami, November 1950.Photograph by Willard Culver, National Geographic

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#vintage, #1950s, #natgeo, #photography, #florida

Aug. 2, 1976: Doreen Haviland, in front, rides the flume with Tara Nugent and Officer Dick Porteus in this photo, taken in Coney Island at the 40th annual Police Anchor Club outing for the widows and children of deceased police officers. See related archival photos of children on the Lens blog. Photo: Barton Silverman/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1970s, #1976, #cyclone, #coney_island, #police_anchor_club

June 2, 1921: John Henry Whitley, the new speaker of the House of Commons, donning his robes for an “exclusive unpublished photograph.” “Dress and attendant emphasize the tenacious British adherence to tradition,” the caption points out. Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1920s, #house_of_commons, #john_henry_whitley, #britain, #robes

At Space Academy in Huntsville, Ala., a group of young space enthusiasts took a close look at a suit like the ones worn on the moon. A reporter would describe the program at Adult Space Academy, developed from the original version for children, as “a kind of amusement park for grownups,” but “it can also be remarkably, seductively involving.” “For me, " wrote Philip Friedman in The Times, “the true revelation came from being a member of a mission-control team on the ground. In trying to master a...

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#amusement_and_theme_parks, #alabama, #huntsville, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #space_academy, #adult_space_academy, #philip_f

February 21, 2011 Date unknown

Feb. 3, 1934: “Automotive Transportation Reduced to a Minimum.” This specimen boasts three-quarter horsepower  and dinner-plate-size wheels. “It is said a small child can drive it with safety,” the caption reassures us. Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1930s, #1934, #automobile, #car, #horsepower

March 11, 2012

The National Symphony Orchestra performs on the Potomac River, March 1942.Photograph by J. Baylor Roberts, National Geographic

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#1940s, #black_and_white, #vintage, #roberts, #natgeo, #cars, #music

Aug. 12, 1935: From the Cleveland bureau, the winner of an “elimination heat” crossed the finish line at the National Soap Box Derby in Akron, Ohio. A crash of one of the soap boxes into the judges’ stand later that day injured three, none seriously, however. Maurice E. Bales, 13, from Indiana, won the derby, and officials noted that “25 persons were overcome by the heat during the spectacle.” Mr. Bales won a four-year scholarship to any state university in the country, a trophy and a “midget ra...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1930s

The U.S.S. Arizona, launched in 1915 and commissioned in 1916, did not see action in World War I, but was part of the convoy that conveyed President Woodrow Wilson to Paris for the peace conference that eventually produced the Treaty of Versailles, signed in 1919. The Arizona was sunk in the attack on Pearl Harbor in 1941. Photo: The New York Times

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#world_war_i, #treaty_of_versailles, #world_war_ii, #arizona, #woodrow_wilson, #paris, #pearl_harbor, #versailles, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_n

A suit built in 1960 by the Republic Aviation Corporation solved the problem of what “the well-dressed man” would “wear for a stroll over the airless moonscape.” The Oct. 16 photo spread promised that the outfit would have its own oxygen supply and that its tripod legs would “enable its wearer to rest by sitting on a perch inside.” The wrench hands were presumably for securing loose screws. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1960s, #1960, #republic_aviation_corporation, #moonscape, #moon, #space_suit

A girl stands in front of her hut on the Painted Desert in Arizona in 1929.Photograph by Clifton R. Adams, National Geographic

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#natgeo, #adams, #photography, #arizona, #desert, #1920s

Oct. 10, 1963: The head of Abraham Lincoln, created by Gutzon Borglum, the sculptor known for the 60-foot heads of Mount Rushmore and the carving in the side of Stone Mountain, Ga. The photographer, George Tames, said that only one day each year, the sun shone directly through the Capitol Rotunda at an angle that would highlight Lincoln’s head. Photo: George Tames/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1960s, #1963, #abraham_lincoln, #gutzon_borglum, #sculpture, #mount_rushmore, #capitol, #capitol_rotunda, #washington_dc

1928: “This youngster has been under the raying of the ultra-violet mercury arc for nearly half an hour,” reads the back of this photo, "but seems none the less happy.” The image was used in the Mid-Week Pictorial on Aug. 18 to illustrate a treatment in Paris for children “suffering from rickets or other maladies common to city children unable to have the healing rays of the sun.” Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1920s, #1928, #ultra_violet, #paris, #rickets, #sun, #medical_treatment, #nurse, #light_therapy

“Who goes to carnivals in this age of television and miniskirts and psychedelic happenings?” asked Richard F. Shepard in the newspaper of Sept. 15, 1967. “To urban bumpkins intent on psychedelic cinema and electronic musicales,” he went on, “carnivals may seem to have gone the way of Congress boots and the hand-pump. Not so.” As the carnival founder’s 37-year-old son, E. James Strates, concurred, “This is no Mickey Mouse business.” Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1960s