Addison Scurlock: Howard University students watching a football game, 1920s

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Addison Scurlock, 1920s, Howard University, Washington D.C., students, women, horizontal

Aug. 3, 1935: “First Aid for the lifeguard’s beauty and romance.” From the  Mid-Week Pictorial, the young buck Derwood Brough, at a beach in Rochester, sported a “soft leather nose guard which he devised after his girlfriend had announced she would not go out with him if his nose became cherry red.” The caption did not say whether she would also not go out with him if he wore the soft leather nose guard. Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1930s

July 4, 1949: Two sailors from Wichita, Kan., arrived via aircraft carrier to New York, to try the parachute drop, a ride inspired by a training device for paratroopers. The ride, at Steeplechase Park in Coney Island, saw its popularity, as well as that of the park, in decline by the 1950s. Steeplechase Park stopped operating in 1964 and the parachute drop, too expensive to tear down, was declared a landmark in 1977. Photo: George Alexanderson/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1940s

To entertain the men, Captain Robert Scott took a gramophone on his South Pole Expedition. Chris, one of his dogs, was apparently also a fan, September 1911.Photograph by Herbert G. Ponting, National Geographic

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#black_and_white, #history, #1910s, #natgeo, #ponting, #dogs, #music

Dec. 27, 1987: “Before the season, both New York teams had been expected to make the National Football League playoffs,” The Times reported of the Jets and Giants. “Instead, each finished with a 6-9 record and last in its division,” and some fans could not bear to show their faces at their last outing. Photo: Barton Silverman/The New York Times

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#playoff_games, #new_york_jets, #national_football_league, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #new_york_giants, #1987, #1980s, #barton

Dec. 5, 1976: Not only did Wise Philip, a horse that had never run a stakes race, win an upset at Aqueduct Racetrack in the $54,100 Discovery Handicap, but New York Times photographer Barton Silverman also won the New York Racing Association’s photo competition. It was not so much a photo finish in the proverbial sense; Times photographers swept the first three prizes. Photo: Barton Silverman/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1970s, #1976, #wise_philip, #aqueduct_racetrack, #discovery_handicap, #new_york_racing_association

July 24, 1970: The highs of the previous summer, when the Apollo 11 spacecraft safely returned from the moon to Earth via the Pacific Ocean, were not reflected in the numbers charting 1970’s economic growth. “The fur industry, which has more than 1,300 manufacturers in New York, has had more than its share of financial troubles this year,” reported Herbert Koshetz, but it wasn’t yet a “dead item.” Mr. Koshetz continued: “The high cost of money has put furriers and skin suppliers in a squeeze,” a...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1970s

maudelynn: Christmas Window Shopping c.1932  via via Mary Evans Picture Library / Everett Collection

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#old

Feb. 18, 1976: Saturday night specials, on display, which did not appear in The Times’s pages until 1980, when the number of illegal handguns in the city was reported at two million. “Respectable people go to bars to buy guns,” said Detective Gloria O’Meara. “The local drug dealer has guns. They’re there for the price.” Photo: Bill Aller/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1970s, #1976, #guns, #crime, #nypd, #new_york, #gloria_omeara, #drug_dealers

Two women in Southeast Asia discuss the day’s news, May 1921.Photograph by M. Branger and Sons

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#asia, #black_and_white, #natgeo, #portrait, #1920s, #photography, #vintage

June 13, 1937: War Admiral, a sound sleeper when the stakes were high, on the morning of his Triple Crown-clinching win at the Belmont Stakes. “War Admiral, winner of all his starts this year, including the Kentucky Derby and Preakness, is fit and ready and is sure to rule an odds-on favorite,” reported The Times. Despite an injury on his back right heel, War Admiral beat his father’s track record at Belmont by a fifth of a second. Photo: The New York Times

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#triple_crown, #belmont_stakes, #preakness_stakes, #horse_racing, #kentucky_derby, #records_and_achievements, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new

1917: German soldiers give disapproving looks to Angela More, played by Mary Pickford, for meddling with their schemes against the French, with whom they are at war, in the Cecil B. De Mille film “The Little American.” Alas, Angela finds herself caught between the affections of Count Jules de Destin of France and the German Karl von Austreim. The count has arranged to have von Austreim, at right, played by Jack Holt, sent to Germany to fight in the war. Melodramatics ensue. Photo: The New York T...

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#defense_and_military_forces, #germany, #mary_pickford, #world_war_i, #cecil_b_de_mille, #silent_films, #the_little_american, #france, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintag

Sept. 21, 1935: Patricia Clare Flynn of Erie, Pa., traveled to Toronto and conquered with bow and arrow, winning the International and North American Junior Girls’ Title. Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1930s, #1935, #patricia_clare_flynn, #bow_and_arrow, #archery

April 29, 1962: The caption of this published morgue file photo read, “Old Faceful: thirsty young lady tries to cope with powerful stream from the drinking fountain in the park at 73rd Street and Riverside Drive.” Photo: John Orris/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1960s, #1962, #riverside_park, #drinking_fountain, #water, #manhattan, #new_york

A student works at the Bezalel School of Arts and Crafts in Jerusalem, 1927.Photograph by Maynard Owen Williams, National Geographic

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#natgeo, #1920s, #art, #photography

June 12, 1938: Evidence of a bygone era, one in which politicians from either side of the aisle could come together and pose on miniature carousel horses donning silly caps, demonstrated here with Representative Bertrand Snell, Republican of New York, left, and Senator Pat Harrison, Democrat of Mississippi, at a meeting of the Alfalfa Club in Frederick, Md. Photo: The New York Times

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#democratic_party, #republican_party, #bertrand_snell, #pat_harrison, #alfalfa_club, #washington, #maryland, #mississippi, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photograph

Sept. 13, 1976: Feathers ruffled, chests puffed out, Muhammad Ali, left, and Ken Norton, right, talked tough for the benefit of the media on the steps of City Hall (photo Page 47 of this paper). Fortunately, Mayor Beame was on hand to keep the peace. The peace ended, according to schedule, on Sept. 28 when Ali beat Norton and retained the world heavyweight championship, though not without controversy. “I thought I won it,” Norton said later. “Ali knew I won it. The people knew I won it.”" P...

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#books_and_literature, #ken_norton, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #abe_beame, #muhammad_ali, #boxing, #1976, #1970s, #prizefightin

Aerial view of Balandra Beach in Baja California, Mexico, October 1972.Photograph by Michael E. Long, National Geographic

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#mexico, #vintage, #1970s, #aerial, #long, #natgeo, #landscape

September 12, 2014 Saul Leiter: Taxi, 1957

A man burns prickly pear to feed cattle during a drought in Texas. Photograph by Luis Marden, National Geographic Creative

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#texas, #black_and_white, #natgeo, #vintage, #history

Thomas Hoepker:  At the civil registry office for bridal couples during a wedding ceremony. Dresden, Saxony, Germany, 1990.

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#thomas_hoepker, #1990s, #1990, #dresden, #saxony, #germany, #wedding, #colour, #horizontal

Oct. 21, 1956: A photo essay in the Times magazine alerted readers to the 58th American Royal Livestock and Horse Show, the largest in the world. More than 5,000 “splendid specimens” of horses, hogs, cattle and sheep drew 150,000 spectators to Kansas City, Mo., and the event — “a tribute to the role of agriculture in the growth of the Middle West” — had many diversions, including a horsemanship contest for teenagers. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1950s, #1956, #american_royal_livestock_and_horse_show, #kansas_city, #mid_west

November 22, 2014 Bettie Page

Jan. 29, 1992: Central Park’s beloved polar bear duo, Ida, left, and Gus — who was later famous for being neurotic, swimming in his pool 12 hours a day out of boredom. In 2011, Ida, Gus’s companion of 24 years, was euthanized after a bout with a painful liver disease. Zookeepers were fearful that Gus would soon succumb to grief, but he died in 2013, at the age of 27. (According to The Times, the median life span for a male polar bear in captivity is 20.7 years.) Photo: Suzanne DeChillo/The New Y...

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#polar_bears, #central_park, #liver, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #gus, #ida, #neuroses, #zoos, #zookeepers, #central_park_zoo, #po

A German shepherd is accepted for sentry duty by the Coast Guard, January 1941.Photograph by J. Baylor Roberts, National Geographic

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#natgeo, #photography, #dogs, #roberts, #military, #german_shepherd

June 2, 1921: John Henry Whitley, the new speaker of the House of Commons, donning his robes for an “exclusive unpublished photograph.” “Dress and attendant emphasize the tenacious British adherence to tradition,” the caption points out. Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1920s, #house_of_commons, #john_henry_whitley, #britain, #robes

October 16, 1971: Sea vessels both huge and minuscule passed each other in New York harbor in the lead-up to the Mayor’s Cup schooner race. The enormous ship at the left and the tiny one in the middle did not compete (schooners have two or more masts) in the competition, which is held in October for its brisk winds and clear air. “Today did not oblige,” reported The Times. “For those in the spectator fleet, the full length of the starting line was barely visible through the fog.“ Photo: Li...

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#elections, #mayors, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1971, #1970s, #schooners, #schooner_racing, #boat_competition, #sailboats_and

Oct. 29, 1964: On the occasion of his retirement from a career in photography, Raymond A. Bustanoby stood by some of the portraits he made of the elite for more than three decades. Herbert Hoover, George Romney, J.C. Penney and other luminaries were in his portfolio. In a story by Robert Frost (though not the Robert Frost), Mr. Bustanoby said, “I can’t remember all the names, but if I saw their proofs, I could probably tell you quite a bit about the man.” Photo: Eddie Hausner/The New York Times

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#robert_frost, #retirement, #herbert_hoover, #jc_penney_company_inc, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1964, #1960s, #portraiture

onlyoldphotography: Alfred Eisenstaedt: Woman under streetlight in Montmartre at night. Paris, France, 1963

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#re_uploaded_in_better_quality

The published caption posed the question: “Are guillotines on the way?” A blurb about the cost of capital punishment in New York cited a study that estimated that “New York’s death penalty would cost, over five years, the same as hiring 250 police officers and building prisons for 6,000 inmates.” Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #guillotine, #beheading, #capital_punishment, #death_penalty, #police, #inmates, #prision

The first successful aerial color photograph—which depicted the Statue of Liberty—used the Finlay process, 1931. Photograph by Melville B. Grosvenor, National Geographic Creative

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#history, #nyc, #natgeo, #grosvenor, #vintage, #1930s, #aerial

Sept. 12, 1960: Flooding on West and Cortlandt Streets, brought by Hurricane Donna, which laid waste to Florida and on up the East Coast. The storm killed dozens in Florida and Puerto Rico and elsewhere. Indeed, according to the National Hurricane Center, it was the United States’ 10th costliest hurricane — adjusted for inflation, population and wealth normalization. The intersection at West and Cortlandt Streets was razed a few years later to make way for the World Trade Center. Photo: Allyn Ba...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1960s, #1960, #flood, #cortlandt_street, #manhattan, #storm, #hurricane, #hurricane_donna

Water from the Dez River in Iran is used for irrigating once-parched land, January 1968.Photograph by Frank and Helen Schreider, National Geographic

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#iran, #1960s, #vintage, #schreider, #landscape, #history, #natgeo