Addison Scurlock: Howard University students watching a football game, 1920s

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Addison Scurlock, 1920s, Howard University, Washington D.C., students, women, horizontal

Teenie Harris: President John F. Kennedy speaking from podium, with Senator Joseph S. Clark and  Pennsylvania Governor David L. Lawrence seated behind him, Monessen, Pennsylvania, October 13, 1962

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Visitors play shuffleboard at a recreation center near Mirror Lake in St. Petersburg, Florida, 1929.Photograph by Clifton R. Adams, National Geographic Creative

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May 10, 2010 via adski_kafeteri.

Dec. 16, 1929: “A Class for Beginners in the Arts of the Cowboys.” In Montana, a visitor to the OTO Homestead and Dude Ranch learned how to manage a bucking bronco. The image ran in the Mid-Week Pictorial. Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1920s, #1929, #montana, #homestead, #dude_ranch, #bucking_bronco, #cowboys

March 29, 1931: Nobel laureate and noted eschewer of combs, Albert Einstein, “dropped his mantle of world scientist for a few hours last night to become simply a gentleman musician,” The Times reported a few years after this photo was taken. (Here, he was passing the time en route to Germany via oceanliner.) The article noted that he was brittle on the subject of playing before an audience of elites on Fifth Avenue. “That Dr. Einstein took his American concert début seriously may be inferred fro...

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#albert_einstein, #germany, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1931, #1934, #1930s, #violin, #secret_talents

Loomis Dean: First US Debutante Ball held at Versailles Palace, at day time rehearsal in palace gardens. 1958

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June 3, 1964: The making of “I Am Cuba,” a film by Mikhail Kalatozov that was not well received when it came out that year and lay almost forgotten for three decades, was described by Stephen Holden in 1995 as “a feverish pas de deux of Eastern European soulfulness and Latin sensuality fused into an unwieldy but visually stunning burst of propaganda.” It was part of the Communist island’s fledgling nationalized motion picture industry, which, The Times reported in 1964, “has advanced from virtua...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1960s, #castro, #cuba, #soviet_union, #cold_war

An eerie vision from October 1970, when the World Trade Center became the world’s tallest building. A 38-foot wall was added to the top of the 100th floor, making the tower four feet higher than the next tallest structure, the Empire State Building, before it reached its full height that December of 1,370 feet. But, it almost goes without saying, from our contemporary vantage, these beams being put into place summon the iconic image of the ground floor structure standing after the towers had col...

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imperialgoogie: 1950sunlimited: extra cool, 1950s You might have swag, but you’ll never have as much swag as these folks.

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April 28, 1948: This photo ran as part of a two-page photo essay about the “Washington scene.” The hats, piled on an eight-foot mahogany table in the lobby of the East Wing of the White House, were deemed “a barometer of presidential activity,” the caption read. “All but the most important visitors leave their gear here. This collection was deposited by a delegation of magazine editors who obtained an appointment with the president.” Photo: George Tames/The Ne...

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Sept. 5, 1961: In the Bergdorf Goodman Custom Salon, Henrietta Gabriel checked a muslin pattern. As The Times reported, Metropolitan Opera labor negotiations were threatening a shipment of fabric on its way to the Custom Salon for the ’61-’62 opera season, and Ethel Frankau, the salon’s director, was anxious. “I don’t know what we’ll do if there’s no opera,” she said. “What about all our brocade?” Photo: The New York Times

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May 28, 2010 Clara Bow

A man and his dog on the Overhanging Rock in Yosemite National Park, May 1924.Photograph by Educational-Bruce Photograph

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#yosemite, #nature, #landscape, #black_and_white, #history, #1920s

July 1, 1960: Happy campers’ eyes were dry on a day of exodus as 7,000 children from the city boarded trains at Grand Central Terminal to be whisked to various summer camps. “By next Thursday,” The Times reported, “about 35,000 will have passed through the terminal and Pennsylvania Station. Other thousands will depart by bus.” Some children, however, stayed behind, and got soaked, as these children did in the Bronx, playing in front of a fire hydrant opened by the Police Athletic League. Photo:...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1960s, #1960, #fire_hydrant, #police_athletic_league, #new_york

March 8, 1931: The actress Katharine Cornell supervised the hanging of her portrait, by Eugene Speicher, in the Empire Theatre in London, where it would be on display during the run of “The Barretts of Wimpole Street.” A week or two before the play opened, The Times wrote of Ms. Cornell, “Elizabeth Barrett is her masterpiece.” According to J. Brooks Atkinson, “If Katharine Cornell continues to put her genius to some creditable use, as she is now doing in ‘The Barretts of Wimpole Street,’ she wil...

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#theater, #katharine_cornell, #the_barretts_of_wimpole_street, #brooks_atkinson, #eugene_speicher, #london, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_yo

April 14, 1933: From the Mid-Week Pictorial, three Burmese “giraffe-necked women” who arrived in New York to “to appear as one of the attractions of the Barnum and Bailey Circus now playing here.” Whether the women were overjoyed to join the circus, or whether they were coerced, is left to readers’ imaginations. When Bertram Mills, the circus mogul who presented the women to the Western world, died in 1938, The Times reported that he “once offered to pay $100,000 to anyone who caught the fabulou...

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A boy between two mounted lobsters caught off the New Jersey coast, February 1915.Photograph by Walter L. Beasley, National Geographic

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A Thai woman poses in a Panung, the national costume, 1907. Photograph by Eliza R. Scidmore, National Geographic Creative

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Late-summer leisure in Atlanta’s Grant Park. “Socially, Atlanta is everything that might be expected of a city with the vim of a Chicago, combined with the Southern graciousness of a Richmond,” The Times wrote in 1895. And although some vestiges of Reconstruction left some Northern men, money and soldiers in the city, “Atlanta is as much a Southern city as Chicago is a Northern or Western one,” The Times averred. Incidentally, Chicago, too, has a Grant Park. Photo: The New York Times

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#atlanta, #chicago, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #grant_park, #neighborhoods

Feb. 24, 1957: A New York Times magazine cover story profiled “the best-known and most controversial figure in the Marine corps today,” the drill instructor. After a disaster in Ribbon Creek in South Carolina in 1956, where six recruits drowned after an intoxicated instructor ordered them into swampy waters, “the drill instructor has passed from parade ground legend to parlor debate,” reported The Times. Photo: George Tames/The New York Times

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#south_carolina, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #ribbon_creek, #marines, #drill_instructor

1800s Portrait of three women featured in the book The Unseen Eye: Photographs from the Unconscious by W.M. Hunt. The Unseen Eye: Photographs from the Unconscious presents a wonderfully idiosyncratic and compelling collection of photographs assembled around a particular theme: in each image, the gaze of the subject is averted, the face obscured or the eyes firmly closed. (via  La Lettre de la Photographie and turnofthecentury)

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blackhistoryalbum:classicladiesofcolor:Ella FitzgeraldFirst Lady of Song, Queen of Jazz…..Lady Ella!

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mudwerks: (via Sisters of the Sun: 1929 [detail] | Shorpy Historical Photo Archive) Circa 1929. “Unidentified women, possibly Elizabeth Duncan dancers.” The gauzy harbingers of Spring. 4x5 nitrate negative by Arnold Genthe. View full size.

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A woman shops for a fur coat at Bergdorf Goodman in New York City. Her Chinese pug, Miss Puffet, sits on a nearby chaise. December 1964. This is a previously unpublished image.Photograph by Albert Moldvay, National Geographic

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Vacationers are silhouetted by a small boat’s sail on Saint John Island, Virgin Islands, 1968.Photograph by James L. Stanfield, National Geographic

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April 20, 1960: A boy observed a tired tiger in the Central Park Zoo. That summer, former Gov. Herbert H. Lehman of New York gave the city $500,000 to build an adjacent zoo for kids, full of “peaceful animals that children are fond of: rabbits, ducks, geese, doves, lambs, calves, pigs, baby deer, llamas, goats and perhaps even a talking crow.” Unlike the normal, “adult” zoo, stands would sell food for the animals so that the children could “hand-feed and pet the tame creatures.” Photo: Sam Falk/...

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Oct. 29, 1989: “Although the Jets’ play improved in the second half, their quarterback, Ken O’Brien, was dumped nine times, equaling the second-highest sack total suffered in the club’s history,” reported The Times. “The Jets went 0 for October, with their fifth consecutive loss of the month. In this streak, the offense has scored one touchdown, and it wasn’t today. It has not scored for three successive games, and for 13 quarters.” Some fans sported masks that spelled out “help” or, possibly, “...

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#football, #organizations, #societies_and_clubs, #new_york_jets, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1989, #1980s, #fans, #fandom, #agon

Sgt. Richard Richards of the 86th Precinct demonstrated his shooting stance at a revolver competition on March 19, 1958. “Almost 300 policeman converged on Central Park yesterday, ready to shoot,” The Times reported. “But their quarries were paper targets and the chance for trophies.” Photo: Ernie Sisto/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1950s, #1958, #richard_richards, #crime, #nypd, #central_park

Aug. 30, 1931: “A new turn in the history of diving” at a pool in Los Angeles, where Georgia Coleman — in preparation for the 1932 Summer Olympics there, where she won two medals — practiced “a complicated fancy dive.” Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1930s, #1931, #diving, #pool, #georgia_coleman, #summer_olympics, #olympics