Addison Scurlock: Howard University students watching a football game, 1920s

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Addison Scurlock, 1920s, Howard University, Washington D.C., students, women, horizontal

April 7, 1946: The caption for this unpublished photograph, taken at the Metropolitan Museum of Art, simply, yet aptly, read, “catacombs of art.” Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1940s, #1946, #metropolitan_museum_of_art, #met, #catacomb, #sculputre, #art_storage

Arizona cowboys play sports to pass the time in Phoenix, 1955. Photograph courtesy Black Star, National Geographic Creative

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#arizona, #vintage, #history, #retro, #natgeo, #black_and_white, #photography

Neon signs blur the night scene as marines walk on the street in San Diego, California, July 1969.Photograph by James L. Amos, National Geographic

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#california, #vintage, #1960s, #amos, #natgeo, #history, #photography

Aug. 7, 1980: Mother Teresa prayed at St. Rita’s Roman Catholic Church in the South Bronx, her first visit to the United States as a Nobel Peace laureate. “Let us thank God for our people, the poor people,” she said at a newly opened soup kitchen there, which she blessed. “They have given us much more than we have given to them. Let us continue to love God in the poor.” Her stay was largely kept private, reported The Times. “ ‘We didn’t tell anybody,’ said Sister Priscilla, who is in charge of t...

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#foreign_students, #teresa, #roman_catholic_church, #southern_states, #united_states, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #mother_tere

Witnesses rushed to the aid of Nell Theobald, a model held in the toothy grip of a 223-pound lion until the lion’s jaws were pried open, at a BMW auto show press preview. Ms. Theobald’s woes continued after the mauling — although doctors saved her leg intact, the $3 million lawsuit she filed was settled, to her disappointment, for $250,000. Later, she became a predator of sorts herself, stalking a Swedish opera singer for nearly 10 years. Ms. Theobald committed suicide in 1977, asking that her a...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1970s

July 8, 1947: “A symbol of Europe’s plight — A Roman black market in shoes,” was the caption. Postwar Europe, though boosted by the Marshall Plan, faced innumerable challenges in 1947. A lengthy piece by Raymond Aron assessed her situation through the prism of the black market: “Black market activities in Rome have become so widespread that they are now know as ‘free markets’. Although shoes are unrationed in Italy, the black market offers a large selection of army surplus and civilian shoes at...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1940s, #1947, #roman, #shoes, #black_market, #europe, #rome, #army_surplus, #post_wwii

February 21, 2010  Brigitte Bardot

onlyoldphotography: Ed Clark: Young artist paints Sacre-Coeur from the ancient Rue Narvins. Paris, France, 1946

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#random_reblog, #things_i_want_to_do_one_day

July 4, 1967: Psychedelic times at the Electric Circus, on St. Mark’s Place in Manhattan, where one might observe “a model in a purple and silver polka dot jump suit” sailing into “the arms of a man dressed as a gorilla,” as one reporter did in The Times later that year. “Then, as the walls crawled with protoplasmic blobs of colored light throbbing with the beat, the model and the gorilla began to frug.” The frug (pronounced froog) being one of many dance crazes sweeping the nation. Photo: Larry...

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#manhattan, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #electric_circus, #summer_of_love, #discotheque, #protoplasmic_blobs, #frug, #psychedel

March 29, 1931: Dr. Hugo Eckener, transport enthusiast and conductor of the famed Graf Zeppelin, rode a “headless horse” aboard the yacht of Col. Edward A. Deeds. The two had met to discuss plans for trans-Atlantic air service, Dr. Eckener’s most recent feat being an exploratory trip to the Arctic. Photo: The New York Times

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#arctic_regions, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1931, #1930s, #graf_zeppelin, #dr_hugo_eckener, #airship, #zeppelin

Feb. 25, 1974: Dar Robinson, a stuntman, leapt from a seven-story building (or was it eight?) to show how life-saving an air-bag device on the ground could be. Mr. Robinson held more than 21 world stunt records, according to The Associated Press, before he died while filming a stunt in 1986. The film, released as “Million Dollar Mystery” in 1987, earned four Golden Raspberry nominations, including Worst Original Song and Worst Actor. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1970s, #1974, #stuntman, #dar_robinson, #film, #movie, #golden_raspberries

A wave of rock shaped by wind and rain towers above a plain in Western Australia, September 1963.Photograph by Robert B. Goodman, National Geographic

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#vintage, #australia, #1960s, #goodman, #natgeo, #landscape

Sept. 16, 1966: Mickey Mantle struck out in a Yankee loss to the Minnesota Twins, a game that came toward the end of a dismal season in which the team came in last place in the American League. A few days later, only 413 people were reported to have attended a Yankee game, which they lost, in a stadium that seated 65,000. Photo: Barton Silverman/The New York Times

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#baseball, #mickey_mantle, #american_league, #minnesota_twins, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1966, #1960s, #low_attendance

July 21, 1943: An M-7 tank, on its way to be inspected by Mayor Fiorello H. La Guardia and then put on display. The tank was lauded for its success routing the Axis forces out of Sicily and North in “Operation Husky,” and, as The Times reported, was “known to the British forces as ‘the priest,’ because of the pulpit-like appearance of its anti-aircraft gun mount.” Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1940s

Oct. 6, 1957: In NATO’s heyday, The Times Magazine published a spread of photographs showing various maneuvers by United States forces and others in the North Atlantic, Turkey, Denmark and elsewhere. The military exercises, performed in preparation for the next global threat, involved land, air and amphibious and submarine forces. “Immediately after NATO’s maneuvers ended, the Russians began theirs in the Barents Sea,” reported The Times. Photo: Hanson Baldwin/The New York Times

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#north_atlantic_treaty_organization, #denmark, #barents_sea, #united_states_defense_and_military_forces, #russia, #turkey, #united_states, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vi

November 29, 2009 Brigitte Bardot

April 1, 1973: Chris Evert chased a ball that eluded her racquet at the Lady Gotham tennis tournament. However, Ms. Evert, a high school senior, defeated Katja Ebbinghaus of West Germany, playing before a crowd that included Vice President Spiro Agnew, and taking home $8,000 in prize money. “The only way, it appears, that rival players can thwart Chrissie’s extensive repertory of ground strokes, delicate drop-shots and lobs and an improving serve is to outslug her on a faster surface or make her...

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#tennis, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #chris_evert, #katja_ebbinghaus, #1973, #1970s, #spiro_agnew

Dec. 16, 1971: Not quite another day at the races at Aqueduct racetrack in Queens as the trainer Frank (Pancho) Martin saw five of his horses win on a nine-race card. “His victories, following as they did his triple of Tuesday, raised his season total at New York to 106, making him second only to the late Hirsch Jacobs, who sent out 129 winners in the 1936 campaign,” reported The Times. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

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#horse_racing, #aqueduct_racetrack, #queens, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1971, #1970s

James van der Zee: The Last Good-bye, 1923 The Last Good-bye really highlights how James Van Der Zee implements his artistic style in his photographs. His technique creates a narrative within the confines of the photograph. The chiaroscuro effect that he utilizes to accentuate and light the piece adds a stillness to the piece.  Especially how he uses the double- exposed image/ caricature that allows the audience to become apart of the picture. We can now visualize what the solider is thinking a...

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#james_van_der_zee, #1920s, #1923, #soldier, #vertical

December 1, 2014
June 1, 2010 via adski_kafeteri.

A Geisha girl poses in her Kimono in Kyoto, June 1927.Photograph by Franklin Price Knott, National Geographic

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#autochrome, #japan, #natgeo, #vintage, #history, #geisha, #1920s, #knott

Nov. 30, 1960: Karen Cohen, allergic to animals with fur but not scales, with her pet snake, Midnight. Karen’s condition and experience with snakes apparently persuaded zookeepers at the Bronx Zoo to let her pet a 12-foot python during a visit. “The snake is nice,” she told the reporter John C. Devlin, “but all those people make me nervous.” Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1960s

Nov. 4, 1953: Though the Metropolitan Opera was turning 70 that year, Gounod’s opera was, as reported by Howard Taubman on Nov. 17,  “being done in a new setting — the romantic spirit of the nineteenth century.” In that romantic spirit, the demon Mephistopheles, played by Nicola Rossi-Lemeni in his New York debut, sang the “Calf of Gold” aria to a cowering crowd in rehearsals. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1950s, #1953, #metropolitan_opera, #nicola_rossi_lemeni, #calf_of_gold

Feb. 27, 1924: The French actress Cécile Sorel, dwarfed by the “massive, woman-headed, lion-bodied mystery of the ages,” the Sphinx in Egypt. Ms. Sorel, like the enigmatic sphinx, was a source of fascination, if headlines in The Times are to go by, from her feelings on movies to a successful suit against a plastic surgeon who left her unable to close her eyes — resulting in “a fishlike stare.” That notice, for the record, appeared on the front page, alongside headlines like “421 Listed As Dead i...

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#egypt, #ethiopia, #france, #italy, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #cecile_sorel, #silent_movie_stars, #sphinx, #fishlike_stares, #b

To entertain the men, Captain Robert Scott took a gramophone on his South Pole Expedition. Chris, one of his dogs, was apparently also a fan, September 1911.Photograph by Herbert G. Ponting, National Geographic

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#black_and_white, #history, #1910s, #natgeo, #ponting, #dogs, #music

Sept. 21, 1948: A nightmare for the city’s sanitation workers and mysophobes as The Times reported that a “survey of the areas flanking the New York Central Railroad elevated structure along Park Avenue, where Harlem merges with the Upper East Side, revealed side street conditions even more foul than those that can be seen daily by thousands of railroad travelers.” The commissioner of housing and buildings, fretting about a citywide problem of accumulating refuse, said it was “almost unbelievabl...

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#railroads, #park_avenue, #harlem, #upper_east_side, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1940s, #1949

Teenie Harris: Three story brick row houses with mansard roofs, and small child on sidewalk of tree lined street with automobiles, 1958

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#teenie_harris, #1950s, #1958, #street, #houses, #cars, #horizontal

Aug. 20, 1975: An enormous metal Whirl-a-Ride hurtled the young and the thrill-seeking through the late-summer air at the 130th Dutchess County Fair in Rhinebeck, N.Y., which had themed days, animals, arts and crafts, and more to offer. But as a fair manager explained in 1972, the county’s identity — bucolic eden or bustling suburb — and thus the fair’s were in flux. “We’re still trying to emphasize agriculture, but we’re really living in the midst of an urban area,” S. Richard Lloyd said. “To a...

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#state_and_county_fairs, #agriculture_and_farming, #dutchess_county, #rhinebeck, #1975, #1970s, #whirl_a_ride, #arts_and_crafts, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #phot

A proud mother greeting her son, returned home from fighting the Great War in Europe. “Like the little city of three hundred years ago,” the Times Magazine reported in 1953, when this picture was reprinted, “the present world capital represents an aspiration: it anticipates the future.” The spread, lavishly illustrated, traced New York’s history from a mercantile town of 800 to a bustling metropolis of 8 million at the time. “Today as the capital of the world not yet in being, it is a hostage to...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1910s, #1950s, #new_york, #world_war_i, #soldier