April 4, 1939: Dorothy Herbert — a Kentucky-native “reared in the knowledge and the love of horseflesh” and a granddaughter of a woman who married a man “for his horse” — rehearsed a feat she would so...

Horses, Madison Square Garden, AE, Kentucky, black and white, nytimes, vintage, photography, The New York Times, 1939, 1930s, Dorothy Herbert, Satan

Cars parked at a drive-in theater with a 53-foot wide screen in Alexandria, Virginia, December 1941.Photograph by J. Baylor Roberts, National Geographic

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#photography, #black_and_white, #vintage, #natgeo, #1940s

Feb. 8, 1979: In Dix Hills, on Long Island, a fresh snow offered sledding for some and slippery conditions for others. This image was reproduced later that same year in the Opinion section of the Long Island edition, accompanying a sort of ode by a nature columnist to the season: “Winter, superficially bleak, masks the natural processes that are continuing in the everlasting struggle to survive,” Sy Barlowe wrote in The New York Times. Photo: Barton Silverman/The New York Times

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#long_island, #dix_hills, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #snow, #odes, #sledding, #slippery_conditions, #1979, #1970s, #barton_silve

Oct. 19, 1987: Terrence J. McManus, a trader with Spear, Leeds & Kellogg, on the floor of the New York Stock Exchange, the day the Dow Jones industrial average lost 22.6 percent of its value. The crash left the nation fearing a recession, but the market rebounded not long after. Photo: Marilynn K. Yee/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1980s, #1987, #spear_leads_and_kellogg, #new_york_stock_exchange, #stocks, #crash_1987, #recession, #stock_market

An informal portrait of photographer and explorer Luis Marden in Chichen Itza, Mexico, 1936.Photograph by Luis Marden, National Geographic

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#black_and_white, #marden, #1930s, #mexico, #history, #natgeo

Dec. 8, 1929: A centipede-like creation comprising several balloons during the annual parade put on by “R.H. Macy & Co.” was set to fly into the sky at the parade’s conclusion. The balloon animal was designed by Tony Sarg, a puppeteer whose name was associated with the parade in the early days — “designed grotesque balloons in annual Macy parade,” his obituary read. Photo: The New York Times

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#parades, #balloons, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #rh_macy_co, #macys, #macys_thanksgiving_day_parade, #thanksgiving, #ce

Jan. 30, 1936: An all-too-familiar story: A cold wave in New York abated somewhat when temperatures climbed to 22 degrees, the warmest it had been in eight days. Long before the phrase “polar vortex” had entered common parlance, The Times reported that though “yesterday’s temperatures were higher than on the preceding seven days, they never went above the freezing point and were of no help to the 30,591 men who continued to try to clear the corrugated crust of ice from the streets,” like these m...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1930s

July 9, 1972: “The concert had been scheduled to start yesterday at 1 p.m. and wind up at 11 last night, but because of delays caused by heavy rains, the last musical note did not sound over the area until 8:45 this morning,” The Times reported of a music festival in Long Pond, Pa., whose performers included Edgar Winter (pictured), Bull Angus, Cactus, Humble Pie, Three Dog Night and Emerson, Lake and Palmer. “The 600-acre infield of the auto track in the hills of eastern Pennsylvania was litter...

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#music, #rain, #three_dog_night, #pennsylvania, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1972, #1970s, #fog, #epic_concerts, #rock_and_roll

March 28, 1991: “For the Grand Central neighborhood, the lighting of the terminal is considered not only esthetic enhancement of its Beaux Arts ornamentation and sculpture,” wrote The Times, “but also a security device that will deter street crime.” And so, the fruits of a project that cost more than $3 million were unveiled at a ceremonial switch-flicking that included the actor Tony Randall. Photo: Jack Manning/The New York Times

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#grand_central_terminal, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1991, #1990s

August 23, 2012

March 31, 1985: “‘Eclectic’ describes not only the props at New York’s more fashionable clubs,” The New York Times reported, “but also the patrons themselves and the way they are dancing.” And as such, the paper offered a sampling of public dancing venues to appeal to all tastes, some “where one can dance to be seen, and others where one can let loose unnoticed.” On Avenue A in Manhattan, Pyramid Club, pictured, appears to be one of the first category. Photo: Sara Krulwich/The New York Times

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#dancing, #manhattan, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #pyramid_club, #eclecticism, #alphabet_city, #1985, #1980s

August 23, 2012
December 23, 2009 via.

Women bask in the sun beside oil pumps, Padre Island, Texas. April 1980.Photograph by Gordon Gahan, National Geographic Creative

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#texas, #1980s, #gahan, #history, #vintage, #natgeo, #summer

Children cool off from summer heat outside a Connecticut firehouse, April 1935.Photograph by Luis Marden, National Geographic

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#photography, #natgeo, #1930s, #summer

A bold statement between two towering obelisks: A spherical sculpture by Fritz Koenig flouted the hegemony of the straight line, provocatively declaring itself between the World Trade Center buildings. It was one of several abstract outdoor sculptures that made a stand in the mid-‘70s. “Among the confusion and hustle of the city, they make a statement,” The Times quoted Doris Freedman, former head of the city’s Department of Cultural Affairs. “They assert an individual presence, they human...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1970s, #fritz_koenig, #world_trade_center, #sphere, #sculpture, #art

June 30, 1938: President Roosevelt inspected the site of the upcoming World’s Fair as part of a 200-mile round-trip jaunt from Hyde Park, N.Y., to New York City, and everywhere he was met with fervor and support. “They pushed and shoved and several fainted along the line of the Presidential procession,” The Times reported, “while patrolmen and detectives in plain clothes tried to keep the crowds in check.” The motorcade “was almost constantly hampered by the throngs,” and “those who long have tr...

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#franklin_roosevelt, #hyde_park, #new_york_city, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1938, #1930s, #worlds_fair

Aug. 4, 1959: Toots Shor at a hole in the wall of his West 51st Street restaurant, Toots Shor’s, which was demolished to make way for the Zeckendorf Hotel. (The wrecking ball was painted to resemble a baseball, a tip to the sportsmen who frequented the restaurant.) Mr. Shor was a one-time speakeasy bouncer “whose style and enterprise carried him into the circles of mink-clad society and cigar-chomping politicians,” according to a 1971 article about the closing of another of his resta...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1950s, #nyc, #toots_shor, #manhattan, #speakeasy, #demolishion, #wrecking_ball, #zeckendorf_hotel

Charles Marville: Homme allongé au pied d'un chàtaignier, 1950-53 This image is somewhat atypical of Marville’s oeuvre. Its atmosphere of intimacy and nonchalance evokes the achievements of the wealthy amateur photographers of the time more than the severe architectural views usually associated with Marville. However, it was published in Blanquart-Évrard’s album, Études photographiques (1853), the title of which suggests that such pictures were intended as studies for artists.

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#charles_marville, #1950s, #1950, #1953, #tree, #man, #vertical, #text

A Nov. 28, 1973, article described a 40 percent rise in tourism in New York over a similar period the previous year, most of it from Europe, like this tourist, armed with two cameras and a cigarette. “Travel agents say that stories about the dangers of New York have been built up and exaggerated in the European press,” reported Deirdre Carmody, but visitors are hardly deterred. “They come here petrified,” the story quoted Bruce Velsor, executive director of Travellers International, as saying, “...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1970s

Aug. 9, 1960: Tom Morton of the American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals took the vital signs of a female indigo snake, which surprised the Manhattan furrier Hercules Cheropoulos one morning as he arrived at work. The snake was determined to be about five years old, three inches thick at its widest and five and a half feet long, but “how it got into the 62-year-old furrier’s shop remained a mystery.” Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1960s

August 30, 2009

Original William Henry Jackson print held in the collection of the Colorado Historical Society. This is a hand-tinted print.Photograph by David Arnold, National Geographic

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#jackson, #natgeo, #handtinted, #history, #art, #vintage

A Sicilian teenage girl draped in lace and a scarf, December 1909.Photograph by Baron Wilhelm Von Gloeden, National Geographic

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#black_and_white, #natgeo, #portrait, #sicily, #photography, #1900s

Sept. 26, 1970: A performance by Julie Christina at Sammy’s Bowery Follies, one of the last vaudevillian establishments on the Bowery in Manhattan, proved something of a eulogy. “Its once booming business — it catered to 100,000 patrons a year during World War II and the postwar years — had fallen off sharply in the last few years under the pressures of inflation and television,” The Times reported. “For many who had known the noisy, smoky, beautifully beerish saloon, with its creaky wooden floo...

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#bowery, #manhattan, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #vaudeville, #cabaret, #sammys_bowery_follies, #1970, #1970s

Dec. 6, 1938: Mayor Fiorella La Guardia applied a sledgehammer to hundreds of slot machines as part of a continuing effort to curb gambling and guns. “The Mayor took a sledgehammer and swung it lustily five times over a slot machine,” reported The Times in 1935. “Here you see a splendid exhibition of police energy. The Police Department, with the cooperation of the five District Attorneys, has been able to put the fear of the Lord into the gangsters. Let this be a notice to them that they will b...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1930s, #1938, #fiorella_la_guardia, #slot_machines, #gambling, #gangsters, #reform

April 1976: A performance by Balaban and Cats, a jazz outfit playing at a club called Eddie Condon’s. “I have been told often that New York is withering on the vine,” Mimi Sheraton wrote. “What I found was that the city was not only alive, but also thriving,” after she set out in search of jazz spots with good food. At Eddie Condon’s, “only spare ribs could be considered edible on the Chinese side of the menu,” Ms. Sheraton declared. “But the New York cut sirloin steak, though a high $9, was dec...

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#jazz, #balaban_and_cats, #eddie_condon, #mimi_sheraton, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1976, #1970s, #french_fries, #sirloin_stea

1930s Way before there even was such a thing as “cosplay”, and it was “just some people dressing up in costumes because it’s fun”, these gents in 1930s Serbia made a paddling of Donald Duck costumes from whatever was lying around. It’s decent handiwork for the time, but it’s a little horrifying these days. (via iheartchaos)

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#old

Vistors sit on an overlook to see scenic views in Yellowstone National Park, June 1940.Photograph by Edwin L. Wisherd, National Geographic

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#vintage, #1940s, #natgeo, #photography, #nature, #landscape

Alexander Graham Bell’s tetrahedral tower is unveiled in 1907 in Nova Scotia.Photograph courtesy the Bell Collection

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#black_and_white, #history, #natgeo, #1900s, #photography, #innovation

Dozens of visitors frolic in the water as seen through a palm frond in Acapulco, Mexico, 1964.Photograph by Thomas Nebbia, National Geographic Creative

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#mexico, #vintage, #natgeo, #1960s, #history, #nebbia

Appearing on April 20, 1975, a profile of our 38th president, Gerald R. Ford, gave the minutes of a day the reporter John Hersey spent with him. Characters included Donald Rumsfeld, then Mr. Ford’s chief of staff and eventually his defense secretary, and in the morning, advisers coordinated a briefing of the press, taking pains to appear transparent and honest. Photo: George Tames/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1970s, #1975, #gerald_ford, #president, #white_house, #donald_rumsfeld, #football

Feb. 12, 1980: In observance with the Year of the Monkey, Chinese lunar year 4678, The Times offered a brief guide of goings-on: “Restaurants will be decorating with images of the monkey and in at least one, Flower Drum,” for example, “the observance will be noted with a program of traditional dances performed by the Chinese Chee Yue Community Association,” demonstrated here. 2016, coincidentally, is also the Year of the Monkey. Photo: Chester Higgins, Jr./The New York Times

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#chinese_new_year, #lunar_new_year, #flower_drum, #year_of_the_monkey, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1980, #1980s