Jan. 9, 1930: “The latest thing in speakeasies: Sergeant Frank T. Zimmie and Detective Joseph Pallinado of the Philadelphia Police, exhibiting one of the twelve pint bottles of liquor cached in...

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black and white, nytimes, vintage, photography, 1930s, 1930, liquor, prohibition, philadelphia

1917: German soldiers give disapproving looks to Angela More, played by Mary Pickford, for meddling with their schemes against the French, with whom they are at war, in the Cecil B. De Mille film “The Little American.” Alas, Angela finds herself caught between the affections of Count Jules de Destin of France and the German Karl von Austreim. The count has arranged to have von Austreim, at right, played by Jack Holt, sent to Germany to fight in the war. Melodramatics ensue. Photo: The New York T...

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#defense_and_military_forces, #germany, #mary_pickford, #world_war_i, #cecil_b_de_mille, #silent_films, #the_little_american, #france, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintag

July 17, 1975: Hoop enthusiasts ages 3 to 15 descended on Tompkins Square Park to compete in the Hula Hoop championship, where they were evaluated on “skill, poise and gracefulness.” Tony Gonzalez, the youngest competitor, was one of 32 talents to take part in the “hoopla,” around which a crowd swelled over three and a half hours. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1970s, #1975, #tompkins_square_park, #new_york, #hula_hoop

People gather on a roof terrace in the District of Columbia as lights come on in nearby buildings, April 1967.Photograph by Joe Scherschel, National Geographic

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#history, #politics, #natgeo, #scherschel, #cityscape, #1960s, #vintage

Dec. 11, 1953: “Sudden, intense winds” blew through New York, reported The Times, frustrating this street cleaner’s efforts to combat entropy and injuring four individuals, one seriously, at Rockefeller Center when a piece of metal was ripped from the United States Rubber Company Building. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1950s, #1953, #wind, #weather, #rockefeller_center, #new_york

An archival photo from The New York Times shows news pictures being sorted in the newspaper’s photo “morgue,” which houses millions of images. Here they are — several each week — for you to see. Welcome to The Lively Morgue. Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #lively_morgue, #archives

December 16, 2014

Aug. 24, 1977: “4-H ain’t all cows and cookin’,” went the agricultural club’s new slogan, to adapt to changing times as rural skills became less in demand. “That was 50 years ago, and in the meantime, people in urban areas needed life skills,” said Philip Pepe, New York City’s 4-H program leader. The club’s new agenda focused on helping children stay in school, improve their scholastic skills and learn other basics, such as sewing, child care and nutrition. But that didn’t preclude the summer pr...

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#organizations, #societies_and_clubs, #new_york_city, #staten_island, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #4_h, #1977, #1970s

July 10, 1960: In Southern California, delegates descended on the Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena to nominate the Democratic candidate for president; John F. Kennedy won on the first ballot, almost doubling the votes that went to Lyndon B. Johnson. This photo adorned The Times Magazine cover, which provided a sort of guide to the convention’s goings-on, the “big powwow.” Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1960s, #california, #jfk, #lyndon_johnson, #presidnet, #los_angeles, #election

Tourists explore eroded clay rock formations in Nevada, 1946.Photograph by W. Robert Moore, National Geographic

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#nevada, #vintage, #moore, #natgeo, #1940s, #kodachrome, #desert, #cars

Oct. 26, 1977: A Puerto Rican nationalist group occupied the Statue of Liberty, draped a Puerto Rican flag across her brow and hoped to invite reporters for a news conference at the statue’s base. As The Times reported, a quick blockade by the Park Police and the Coast Guard cut off all river traffic to Liberty Island, and a support group spoke to the news media instead. When the police went to arrest the protesters, they were cooperative. “If there’s such a thing as being a pleasure to work wit...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1970s

A woman working on a mosaic of Mary and baby Jesus in Vatican City.Photograph by James L. Stanfield, National Geographic

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#stanfield, #history, #art, #natgeo, #vintage

July 2, 1981: A customer and a fabric seller talked textiles on West 57th Street, where one could find Fe-Ro Fabrics, pictured, and a handful of other stores selling cashmeres, silks, tweed, chiffon, velvet and other fancy materials, which were rounded up in a guide to New York City for the lucky “woman with both the talent and the time to make her own clothes.” Photo: Fred Conrad/The New York Times

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#textiles, #new_york_city, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1981, #1980s

Dec. 1, 1964: Nashua’s Pride galloping to victory in a race at Aqueduct in Queens, despite “an icy 18-mile-an-hour breeze sweeping the premises” and empty stands. Still, 17,246 fans braved the cold to place $2 million in bets on the day’s races: “These are the horseplayers,” one trainer told The Times. “This is the hard core, the ones who come every day.” Photo: Meyer Liebowitz/The New York Times

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#queens, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1964, #1960s, #nashuas_pride, #aqueduct_racetrack, #cold_weather, #horse_racing

A tiny model farm built for lightning research and power line tests, June 1950.Photograph by Westinghouse Electric Corp.

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#black_and_white, #miniature, #photography, #electricity, #1950s, #natgeo, #history

December 1, 2014 anyskin: Gillet Herstal

Sept. 28, 1937: A tiger cub embraced Roy Jennier of the National Zoological Park in Washington. The cub was one of about 300 specimens gathered by the National Geographic Society and carried to the United States via freighter for observation, study and entertainment. The one-year expedition was not without its hazards — twice, a seven-foot “dragon lizard from the island of Komodo” escaped its pen and required four crew members to recage him. Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1930s

Feb. 8, 1933: A diving bell (“une cloche à plonger,” for those Francophones who enjoyed the back of the photo), courtesy of Commander Angelo Belloni of the Italian Navy, allowed for its wearer to plunge deeper than 20 meters with great visibility. Before investing himself in this invention, Commander Belloni’s previous exploits included stealing a submarine in 1914 in the hopes of hastening Italy’s entry into World War I. He told his crew that he was on a secret mission and was almost fired upon...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1930s

Victoria amazonica water lilies can reach 20 feet in circumference and support up to 300 pounds each. Perching children atop the massive leaves was all the rage in water gardens of the time. Salem, North Carolina, c. 1892. Photograph by Frank Hege, National Geographic

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#history, #black_and_white, #photography, #vintage, #gardening, #natgeo, #1890s

Dec. 7, 1929: The text accompanying this photo read: “Thereby hangs a tale: A native in South Africa taking liberties with the king of beasts and living to tell.” Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1920s, #1929, #south_africa, #lion, #king_of_beasts, #native

Police officers kept an eye on a Soviet navy training ship, the Druzhba, on Aug. 14, 1990. The unpublished photo was part of coverage for an Aug. 17 article that described the city’s police department “stretched thin by budget cuts and rising crime.” The commissioner was reported to be looking into whether or not officers were “overspecialized” and too “preoccupied with duties that distract them from their central mission of preventing and fighting crime.” Photo:

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1990s, #nypd, #police, #fiscal_crisis, #new_york, #harbor, #druzhaba, #ship

April 21, 2010 Alfred Hitchcock

May 12, 1940: “The new swimming pool quickly proves its popularity among the members,” said the published caption showing the Madison Square Boys Club on East 30th Street in Manhattan. The photo was published by itself in the “Mid-Week Pictorial.” But an article a week earlier introduced the new club, built with a $400,000 donation. “Business leaders, wealthy financiers and other well-placed men apparently have a very soft spot in their hearts for street urchins,&rd...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #sports, #1940s, #1940, #madison_square_boys_club, #manhattan, #pool, #swimming, #charity

Dec. 21, 1933: From the Mid-Week Pictorial. Americans visiting Paris celebrated the end of Prohibition in the United States in a “real two-fisted manner,” its original caption stated. Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1930s, #1933, #prohibition, #paris, #drinking, #two_fisted, #drunk

An Egyptian belly dancer performs for tourists in a nightclub in Cairo, 1972. Photograph by Winfield Parks, National Geographic Creative

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#vintage, #1970s, #natgeo, #history, #egypt, #parks

The Moulin Rouge at Montmartre in Paris, 1923.Photograph by Jules Gervais Courtellemont, National Geographic

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#paris, #courtellemont, #1920s, #natgeo, #autochrome, #vintage, #history

April 27, 1984: The Lightning Loop at Great Adventure in Jackson Township, N.J., appeared above an article about attracting older crowds to amusement parks. Marketers hoped that by making the new parks “discreetly educational,” with better food or “designer merchandise,” that they might appeal to “an older, calmer, more sophisticated generation.” Food-wise, “the parks are experimenting with everything form pita bread sandwiches to lobster. … Older patrons, the rationale goes, are interest...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1980s, #1984, #great_adventure, #jackson, #new_jersey, #roller_coaster, #amusement_park, #rides

A baseball player slides into home base while an umpire calls safe, August 1919.Photograph by Paul Thompson, National Geographic

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#history, #black_and_white, #natgeo, #1910s, #photography, #vintage, #sports

Aug. 12, 1960: The champion fencers Maxine Mitchell, left, and Janice-Lee Romary practice-dueled atop the Vanderbilt Hotel in preparation for the summer Olympics in Rome (seen on Page 19 of this paper). Ms. Mitchell and Ms. Romary — who placed 11th and fourth in the individual foil contests in the 1956 Olympics — were participating in the first women’s team foil. In the end, the Soviet Union, Hungary and Italy won the top medals. Photo: William C. Eckenberg/The New York Times

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#olympic_games, #italy, #hungary, #rome, #ussr, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1960s, #1960

June 13, 2009 Mary Pickford