Jan. 9, 1930: “The latest thing in speakeasies: Sergeant Frank T. Zimmie and Detective Joseph Pallinado of the Philadelphia Police, exhibiting one of the twelve pint bottles of liquor cached in...

black and white, nytimes, vintage, photography, 1930s, 1930, liquor, prohibition, philadelphia

August 23, 2012

Runway model shows off gown made of Como silk in Belagio, Italy, July 1968.Photograph by Joe Scherschel, National Geographic

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#vintage, #fashion, #italy, #couture, #1960s, #natgeo, #scherschel

Feb. 18, 1928: Ray Keech of Atlantic City posed alongside his 36-cylinder triplex, with which he hoped to break the world’s land speed record. He succeeded on April 22, beating the record with a speed of 207.55 miles per hour at Daytona Beach, Fla. His record held till March 1929, when it was exceeded by Maj. H.O.D. Seagrave in his car, the Golden Arrow. Not long after, Mr. Keech was killed in a four-car accident during a race in Altoona, Pa., though he was posthumously declared the winner of th...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1920s, #1928, #ray_keech, #atlantic_city, #land_speed_record

Original William Henry Jackson print held in the collection of the Colorado Historical Society. This is a hand-tinted print.Photograph by David Arnold, National Geographic

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#jackson, #natgeo, #handtinted, #history, #art, #vintage

April 9, 1969: Wearing white football helmets and stoic expressions of determination, the astronauts of Apollo 9 ½ bid their mothers goodbye and embarked on their mission: “A five-day experiment in the ways of spaceflight, simulating the isolation and confinement of life in a capsule, some of the navigational chores of real astronauts, the rather unpalatable orbital diet — nearly everything but the vibrations of blast-off and the feeling of weightlessness.” The preparations, enumerated he...

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#space_and_astronomy, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1969, #1960s, #apollo_program, #junior_high, #apollo_9_12, #parents, #junior

November 27, 1941 With some of New York’s skyscrapers looming through clouds of gas, some U.S. army nurses at the hospital post at Fort Jay, Governors Island, New York, wear gas masks as they drill on defense precautions. (via The Atlantic)

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#old

July 3, 1965: A scourge of “gray-flanneled” motorcycle riders gripped the city, wantonly parking their bikes wherever they pleased. “They belonged to Madison Avenue’s new breed of wild ones — junior account executives, commercial artists and salesmen,” reported The Times, who had “come upon a block with no apparent parking restrictions.” Spotted one summer afternoon, the producer Ted Devlet with his wife. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

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#madison_avenue, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1965, #1960s, #ted_devlet, #motorcycles

onlyoldphotography: Alfred Eisenstaedt: Woman under streetlight in Montmartre at night. Paris, France, 1963

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#re_uploaded_in_better_quality

From the Mid-Week Pictorial, a display of the Army’s new flying fort. Maj. Gen. Mason M. Patrick, chief of the Army Air Service, right, inspected the giant Condor bombing plane at Wright Field in Ohio with Brigadier Gen. William E. Gilmore, chief of the material division of the Air Service. Aug. 28, 1927. Photo: The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1920s, #army, #wright_field, #gen_william_e_gilmore, #air_service, #1927, #airplane

Deborah Turbeville: Anh Duong and Marie-Sophie in Emanuel Ungaro, VOGUE, Chateau Raray, France, 1984

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#deborah_turbeville, #1980s, #1984, #fashion, #vogue, #colour, #horizontal, #emanuel_ungaro, #anh_duong, #marie_sophie, #nude, #models, #chateu_raray, #france

November 1960: Dogs howled into the wind at the New Zealand Scott Base, on the McMurdo Sound of Antarctica’s southern shores. Not long after the photo was taken (Nov. 6), a magnetic storm wiped out communications between the base and researchers based in Christchurch, New Zealand. “There is no fear for the safety of the men in icy isolation at the bottom of the world,” The Times wrote, but “the current radio blackout does further jeopardize the achievement of several scientific goals set for dee...

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#new_zealand, #antarctic_regions, #christchurch, #washington, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1960, #1960s, #mcmurdo_sound, #magnet

Aug. 7, 1959: A 15-foot clock hung over the bustle of Grand Central Terminal, sporting an advertisement for its maker, Westclox (appearing on Page 19 of this issue). The clock would bear the logos of several companies through the years; eventually, it was removed. Photo: Arthur Brower/The New York Times

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#grand_central_terminal, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #westclox, #1959, #1950s, #clocks, #timepieces, #time

July 9, 1978: In an Italian section of Williamsburg, Brooklyn, St. Paulinus of Nola was honored in classic tradition during an annual parade. It took 150 men to carry a giant monument, or “giglio,” to the saint to Our Lady of Mount Carmel Church. Photo: Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1970s, #brooklyn, #st_paulinus, #giglio, #our_lady_of_mount_carmel, #italian, #festival, #tradition

A view of Saint Basil’s Cathedral in Red Square, Russia, shot through a store window. Photograph by Jodi Cobb, National Geographic Creative

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#russia, #moscow, #vintage, #history, #cobb, #natgeo

onlyoldphotography: Alfred Eisenstaedt: Couples in Penn Station sharing farewell kisses before soldiers ships off to war during WWII, 1943, NY. Eisenstaedt when speaking of the time he photographed American soldiers saying farewell to their wives and sweethearts in 1944 on assignment for Life: “I just kept motionless like a statue.” he said. “They never saw me clicking away. For the kind of photography I do, one has to be very unobtrusive and to blend in with the crowd.”

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#re_uploaded_in_better_quality, #i_always_loved_this_set

A girl sits by a lake with snow-capped mountains in the background, California, 1929. Photograph by Charles Martin, National Geographic Creative

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#california, #autochrome, #vintage, #1920s, #history, #natgeo, #martin

Nov. 5, 1922: Lulu McGrath is greeted by a diver in “Wonders of the Sea,” filmed off the Bahamas during the early days of underwater motion pictures. A report the following spring on a project by J.E. Williamson, the film’s director, related the perils of camera work at the time: “Not so very long ago, an intrepid photographer, when attempting to get a picture from an airplane of the crater of Vesuvius, just saved himself from falling into the seething, angry lava. This same cameraman, who is em...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1920s, #1922, #lulu_mcgrath, #wonders_of_the_sea, #bahamas, #film, #director, #je_williamson, #fox_news

All you could want to know about this “hybrid beast,” the blimp, (“one part surface ship, one part submarine, one part balloon and one part plane”) was laid out in an Aug. 14, 1955 Sunday Magazine article, “The Whales of the Air Are Flying Again.” The article heralded a return of the “bloopy bags” to the skies, largely out of commission since the 1937 Hindenburg disaster. Photo: George Tames/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1950s, #1955, #blimp, #zeppelin

onlyoldphotography: George Hoyningen-Huene: Divers, Paris, 1930 Hoyningen-Huene’s best-known photograph shows two bathers - one, his lover and protégé, Horst P. Horst; the other, an androgynous female model - facing away from the camera, staring across an infinite horizon toward the “sea” (in reality, the balustrade on the roof of Vogue’s Paris studio). Here and in all of Hoyningen-Huene’s best works, lighting imparts drama, sophistication and longing for both.

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#popular_posts_of_2014

A shelter made of antlers at Yellowstone National Park.Photograph by Edwin L. Wisherd, National Geographic

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#black_and_white, #parks, #natgeo, #wisherd, #photography

sisterwolf: Gypsy Dancer, 1956  from the book “Singing is forbidden:Flamenco and Photography” via

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#old

March 1, 1917: A street scene in Jerusalem, outside of which British troops were advancing on the forces of the Ottoman Empire. The British were beaten back, but a siege and a battle later that year decisively put the city in their hands. Photo: The New York Times

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#great_britain, #ottoman_empire, #jerusalem, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #sieges, #1917, #1910s, #world_war_i, #colonialism

April 9, 1985: The pitching prodigy Dwight Gooden on the mound in his second season with the Mets, where at age 20 he “became the youngest winner of the Cy Young Award,” reported The Times in 2001, when he retired. “He was so good,” said his pitching coach with the Yankees, Mel Stottlemyre, but, recalling the substance abuse problems that surfaced after the Mets’ 1986 World Series win, he added, “In this game sometimes too much success too early can be as harmful as it is helpful to us.” Photo:...

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#baseball, #new_york_mets, #dwight_gooden, #cy_young_award, #new_york_yankees, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1985, #1980s

May 5, 1960: A citywide air-raid drill stilled New York for 15 minutes, and everyone was ordered to take shelter. Television was blacked out while radio broadcast only emergency instructions. Con Edison reported a 90 percent cut in electrical demand during those 15 minutes, but there were still about 150 protesters outside City Hall, refusing to participate and calling for disarmament. A nationwide radio test had President Eisenhower cautioning that “it would be unwise to neglect our Civil Defen...

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#test, #dwight_d_eisenhower, #bronx_zoo_wildlife_conservation_park, #consolidated_edison_inc, #new_york_city, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_ne

Oct. 18, 1935: Racing skippers in the waters off the Isle of Wight, the Yankee versus the Britannia, which carried on board King George V. “Britannia did well all day, beating the American yacht Yankee, with which she kept constant company, over most of the course, although the King’s yacht returned after being becalmed off Lymington,” The Times reported on a race that August. The Britannia was scuttled the next year, following the death of the king, whose dying wish was that the yacht be “burie...

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#isle_of_wight, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #king_george_v, #england, #britannia, #yankee, #yachts, #sailing_races, #sailing, #19

May 12, 2009 Marilyn, of course!

April 11, 1975: Two people ran onto the field at Shea Stadium with a banner (is the word “war” visible on its front?) during a Yankee loss to the Detroit Tigers. In Milwaukee, Hank Aaron received a standing ovation at the opener to his final season in baseball. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

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#baseball, #hank_aaron, #detroit_tigers, #shea_stadium, #milwaukee, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #home_runs, #homers