Jan. 9, 1930: “The latest thing in speakeasies: Sergeant Frank T. Zimmie and Detective Joseph Pallinado of the Philadelphia Police, exhibiting one of the twelve pint bottles of liquor cached in...

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black and white, nytimes, vintage, photography, 1930s, 1930, liquor, prohibition, philadelphia

Jan. 11, 1957: The superintendent of 2001 Grand Concourse in the Bronx, Mary Sideris, swept away floodwater from a water main break in the building’s courtyard. Traffic was rerouted and the subway closed, and the break left a hole 15 feet wide and 10 feet deep. In 1980, Rep. Elizabeth Holtzman of New York’s 16th district illustrated a point about the state of New York’s water pipes using Ms. Sideris’s image alongside a letter to the editor. “In 1979 there were over 500 water main breaks in the c...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1950s

Children read a Sylvan Drew Circus billboard, 1931. Photograph by Jacob J. Gayer, National Geographic Creative

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#history, #vintage, #circus, #autochrome, #gayer, #natgeo, #retro, #1930s

February 20, 2010 Thanks, Hemeterio.

Nov. 13, 1921: The front page reported on a quixotic proposal for a “10-year naval holiday”; the weather on Monday was going to be “unsettled, probably warmer”; and, nestled among pictures of Victor Emmanuel III and a chrysanthemum show, a scene of the “Cabbage Fair” in the Montmartre neighborhood of Paris. Photo: The New York Times

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#paris, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1921, #1920s, #league_of_nations, #cabbage_fair, #montmartre

Nov. 27, 1969: Youngsters found a good spot to view the Macy’s Thanksgiving Day Parade, from atop a telephone booth. “It was a day of abundance, not only of foods and goods, but of emotions also,” reported The Times. “Five raggedy children entered the Salvation Army cafeteria at 535 West 48th Street and, sitting among the weary old men and women who traditionally feast with the army on this holiday, received heaps of turkey and potatoes, peas and pumpkin pie.” Elsewhere, some G.I.s boycotted tur...

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#united_states_defense_and_military_forces, #salvation_army, #boycotts, #parades, #vegetarian_society, #macys_inc, #vietnam, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photog

Oct. 26, 1977: A Puerto Rican nationalist group occupied the Statue of Liberty, draped a Puerto Rican flag across her brow and hoped to invite reporters for a news conference at the statue’s base. As The Times reported, a quick blockade by the Park Police and the Coast Guard cut off all river traffic to Liberty Island, and a support group spoke to the news media instead. When the police went to arrest the protesters, they were cooperative. “If there’s such a thing as being a pleasure to work wit...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1970s

Dec. 2, 1952: Freight yards at Twelfth Avenue and 72nd Street were covered in slushy precipitation during a day of snowfall. Photo: Eddie Hausner/The New York Times

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March 3, 2010 via Blake.

Men stand beside a volcano’s crater eighteen months after an eruption on Tristan da Cunha Island, 1964.Photograph by James P. Blair, National Geographic Creative

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#blair, #1960s, #natgeo, #vintage, #history, #landscape

Dec. 21, 1970: Fans of the New York Giants who couldn’t get into a big football game at Yankee Stadium crowded on rooftops to watch their team be soundly defeated by the Los Angeles Rams. It was a 31-3 rout, but fans could take heart that the Rams were also kept out of the playoffs, after San Francisco beat Oakland to top the N.F.C. Western Division and Detroit snagged the conference’s wild-card spot. Photo: Ernie Sisto/The New York Times

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#football, #los_angeles_rams, #new_york_giants, #st_louis_rams, #yankee_stadium, #detroit, #oakland, #san_francisco, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the

onlyoldphotography: Robert Capa: Henri Matisse drawing with a bamboo pole tipped with charcoal. Cimiez (Nice), France, August 1948

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vintagetails: The cat, boy with missing front teeth in cap and sidewalk bike. Found vintage photo with no ID.

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September 1933: Enthused parade-goers thronging along Fifth Avenue had to be contained by policemen to keep the street clear. Starting at Washington Square and stretching to 72nd Street, the parade was in honor of the N.R.A. — that is, the National Recovery Administration, the New Deal initiative aimed at improving business practices by setting price controls, mandating minimum wages and limiting a work week’s hours, among other measures. “Preliminary reports reaching me indicate that the N.R.A....

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#parades, #minimum_wage, #national_recovery_administration, #new_deal, #great_depression, #franklin_roosevelt, #supreme_court, #fifth_avenue, #new_york_city, #black_and_w

July 13, 1958: Blueberry pie with a lattice topping. Jellied strawberries in a golden crust. Old-fashioned two-crust berry pie. Gossamer-textured eggnog chiffon pie with raspberries. Photographed in the New York Times studio, these four pies — pictured from top to bottom — were “made with plump, ripe pickings from summer vines,” as the original caption says. They were “especially welcome” then. We’d wager they’d still taste good today. Photo: Alfred Wegener/Th...

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#black_and_white, #food, #nytimes, #photography, #vintage, #1950s, #1958, #blueberry_pie, #pie, #food_photography

February 12, 1954 12-year-old Muscle Beach ‘regular’, April Atkins, displays unusual strength as she supports four persons weighing a total of 633 pounds on her back. (via USC Digital Library)

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July 24, 1920: Wicker chairs and flags for breezy repose on the Baltic Sea, where German vacationers, then as now, sought tranquility on “sand so fine that it ‘sings.’ ” Photo: The New York Times

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#baltic_sea, #germany, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1920, #1920s, #vacations, #beaches, #sand, #wicker_chairs

November 1927: Clarence Chamberlain, transatlantic flyer, ferrying Saint Nick about in an airplane, which landed on the parade grounds of Prospect Park in Brooklyn, cheered by 30,000 school children. “As the plane landed, Santa’s sleigh was drawn up by reindeers and the children had an opportunity to tell him what they would like for Christmas,” The Times reported. In other Santa news of that day, a report on “standarizing” Santas, and a list estimating X-mas expenditures: “Santa Claus Whiskers...

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#santa_claus, #brooklyn, #prospect_park, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1927, #1920s, #clarence_chamberlain, #transatlantic

Nov. 1, 1955: The zookeeper Fred Martini, of the Bronx Zoo’s lion house, with Dot and Dash, newly arrived yet sensitive cheetahs. They were reported to “make certain that their antics” — which included paw swipes, pants-tugging, jumping and nipping — “were all in good fun,” and not a prelude to mauling Mr. Martini before the crowd. They concluded the meet-and-greet by gently licking his face and hands. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1950s

Dec. 21, 1993: Twenty years ago, almost to the day, a reindeer conducted Charles H. Evans’s automobile on the Henry Hudson Parkway right into a logjam of traffic. Photo: Ángel Franco/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1990s

Jan. 16, 1974: A scene for “The Taking of Pelham One Two Three” was filmed in an abandoned subway tunnel in Brooklyn. The photo ran with an article later that year about the decline of the film industry in New York, which cited factors including an industry exodus to the West Coast and a "fear of crime in the streets and a disenchantment with the city.” Photo: Larry C. Morris/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1970s, #movies, #the_taking_of_pelham_one_two_three, #brooklyn, #subway, #film, #1974, #movie_set, #crime

Nov. 24, 1964: James Beard, he of the eponymous cooking award, demonstrated cooking at his cooking school on East 10th Street. His book “Delights and Prejudices” was published earlier that year and comprised stories and reflections about his beginnings in the food business. An early gastronomic impression: “I was on all fours. I crawled into the vegetable bin, settled on a giant onion and ate it, skin and all. It must have marked me for life, for I have never ceased to love the hearty flavor of...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1960s, #1964, #james_beard, #cooking_school

East German children nap in a collective day care so parents can work, September 1974.Photograph by Gordon Gahan, National Geographic

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#germany, #1970s, #gahan, #natgeo, #history, #vintage

Oct. 4, 1960: Carol Kroon, one of the Metropolitan Opera’s ballet corps, practiced before a mirror just as the season prepared to take off. A photo spread in The Times Magazine previewed things to come. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

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#metropolitan_opera, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1960, #1960s, #ballet, #dance, #carol_kroon

onlyoldphotography: Alfred Eisenstaedt: Teenage couples engaged in a Sniff Game where a Kleenex is passed from nose to nose at a house party. Oklahoma, 1948

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#re_uploaded_in_better_quality

July 26, 1959: “Taxes are the death of taxidermy,” lamented Elmer E. Rowland (not pictured) in an article about a bear market for taxidermists, who were closing down their shops. The demand for stuffed tigers or mounted marlins wasn’t the same as it was in the days of the Vanderbilts or Astors, they said. Fred Sauter, Mr. Rowland’s associate in the photo, said: “Some of the specimens in the old days would take up a whole wall in somebody’s mansion. Now who has a wall that big?” Photo: John Orris...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1950s, #1959, #taxidermy, #bear_hunt, #hunting

July 31, 1927: “There will be many tributes to Sir Thomas Lipton,” predicted The Times, announcing the immortality of the namesake of Robert D. Hocking’s trophy held here (photo on Page 99 of this issue). “He was one of the great merchants of the British Empire,” and known to Americans for his tea brand and as a dogged pursuer of the America’s Cup yachting trophy, playing Ahab to the cup’s white whale.“ Photo: The New York Times

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#sailboats_and_sailing, #united_states, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1920s, #sir_thomas_lipton, #lipton_tea, #moby_dick

April 13, 1984: Judith Denman and Donlin Foreman, “a stately pair,” in “Adieu,” a ballet choreographed by Eliot Feld, which was given a mixed review by The Times. The dancers “at times certainly appeared to be engaged in leave-taking. At other times, they were meditative in choreography that was often visually striking. But the work would have been even more poignant if Mr. Feld had been clearer about just what it was his people were bidding adieu to.” Photo: Larry C. Morris/The New York Times

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#dancing, #adieu, #eliot_feld, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #judith_denman, #donlin_foreman, #1984, #1980s

July 4, 1952: Chicago. As part of its coverage of the Republican National Convention, The Times ran a full program and a chart showing the positions that delegates would occupy on the convention floor. “Some 99 percent of the nation’s television sets in 64 cities will receive ‘live’ coverage of the conventions,” an article read. Photo: George Tames/The New York Times

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1950s, #chicago, #republican_convention, #1952, #politics, #political_convention, #tv

Marjorie Rambeau — “one of Hollywood’s greatest character actresses,” according to The Boston Globe — performed “Just Life” at Henry Miller’s Theatre, circa 1926, according to this notice in The Times. The notice brought readers details of Ms. Rambeau’s third marriage, in 1931, to Francis A. Gudger, “retired business man of Sebring, Fla.” Photo: The New York Times

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#just_life, #boston_globe, #florida, #hollywood, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #marjorie_rambeau, #character_actress, #henry_mill

mudwerks: (via Sisters of the Sun: 1929 [detail] | Shorpy Historical Photo Archive) Circa 1929. “Unidentified women, possibly Elizabeth Duncan dancers.” The gauzy harbingers of Spring. 4x5 nitrate negative by Arnold Genthe. View full size.

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A couple seated in a living room looks out a window at skiers on lawn in Duluth, Minnesota, September 1949.Photograph by B. Anthony Stewart and Jack E. Fletcher, National Geographic

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#vintage, #photography, #natgeo, #1940s, #winter

Sept. 2, 1971: Fans reached for a foul ball hit by Horace Clarke of the Yankees in the first inning of a 2-0 loss to the Washington Senators, who maintained a “strange dominance over the Yankees,” who managed only four hits. Not three weeks later, the Senators were given approval to move to Texas to become the Rangers. Senators fans were so angry that some stormed the field during the team’s last game in Washington, another against the Yankees, and someone made off with first base. The umpire ca...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1970s, #1971, #yankees, #horace_clarke, #yankee_stadium, #washington_senators, #texas_rangers

February 21, 2010 Brigitte Bardot

Nov. 15, 1971: “It’s that time of year, when ethnic society, homesick for its native accents, gets together to whoop it up,” reported The Times. At such a party devoted to Spanish — specifically, Catalan — culture, the chef stole the show. “Pepe, as he is called, not only produced a sumptuous buffet, but he also emerged as a superb flamenco dancer. At 2 o’clock in the morning, after having served a breakfast of churros (ropes of cruller-like fried dough) and hot chocolate, Pepe danced to the gui...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1970s, #1971, #spain, #flamenco, #restaurant, #new_york

A shelter made of antlers at Yellowstone National Park.Photograph by Edwin L. Wisherd, National Geographic

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#black_and_white, #parks, #natgeo, #wisherd, #photography

Nov. 26, 1908: Stanley Ketchel of Grand Rapids, Mich., knocked out Billy Papke, the Illinois “thunderbolt,” in the 11th round in a middleweight title bout held in San Francisco. “I am not satisfied with the result,” Papke said after the fight. “I want a return. I did not hear the count. I heard the referee say ‘six,’ and then he stopped. I would have been able to continue the fight, as I was not hurt and recovering fast. I want a return match.” Photo: The New York Times

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#grand_rapids, #illinois, #michigan, #san_francisco, #black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #the_new_york_times, #1900s, #1908, #boxing, #middleweight, #fisticuf

Appearing in The New York Times Magazine, a photograph from the 1956 presidential campaign trail of Adlai Stevenson, who would lose for the second time in a row to Dwight D. Eisenhower. The Nov. 6, 1960, article about the pedestal-smashing contest between John F. Kennedy and Richard M. Nixon that accompanied this photo speculated on what happens when a presidential candidate fails to win. “Often the man defeated for President ends up with no office of any sort,” a subhead read. Photo: George Tam...

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#black_and_white, #nytimes, #vintage, #photography, #1950s, #1956, #adlai_stevenson, #eisenhower, #jfk, #nixon, #elections, #president