Children cool off from summer heat outside a Connecticut firehouse, April 1935.Photograph by Luis Marden, National Geographic

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 Francis Wu: Shellfish Catching at Dawn, undated Francis Wu, who moved to Hong Kong in 1931, always wanted to show the world that Hong Kong is to be respected and recognized in the field of photography. The name Francis Wu is an institutional with local and overseas photographers. Francis lived in Hong Kong for over 50 years. He is part of Hong Kong’s photographic history. Mr. Wu maintains as one of the top ambitions the spreading of photography among the Chinese. He made a number of trips to v...

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Sept. 17, 1952: The Republican nominee for president, Dwight D. Eisenhower at the Commodore Hotel, where he kept his campaign headquarters. The next morning, he was present at 7:25 a.m. to begin a 17-hour day that ended after midnight. A Hollywood executive supporting Mr. Eisenhower offered to give his opponent, Gov. Adlai Stevenson of Illinois, a job in Hollywood as a script writer if he lost the election. “I believe he writes the best dialog about nothing of any man I know,” said Darryl F. Zan...

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sisterwolf: Gypsy Dancer, 1956  from the book “Singing is forbidden:Flamenco and Photography” via

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July 15, 1952: With the help of several tugboats, the S.S. United States entered the Hudson River after setting trans-Atlantic speed records to and from Europe. “The few thousands who turned out in the morning heat to watch the liner enter the harbor were astonished at the scars she bore — paint peeled from her slender black hull by wave friction as she averaged 34.48 knots in the 3,155 miles from Le Havre to New York,” The Times reported. Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times

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Shan man and two priests prepare to set off bamboo rockets in rain, Myanmar, November 1931.Photograph by W. Robert Moore, National Geographic

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November 27, 1941 With some of New York’s skyscrapers looming through clouds of gas, some U.S. army nurses at the hospital post at Fort Jay, Governors Island, New York, wear gas masks as they drill on defense precautions. (via The Atlantic)

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Feb. 24, 1957: A New York Times magazine cover story profiled “the best-known and most controversial figure in the Marine corps today,” the drill instructor. After a disaster in Ribbon Creek in South Carolina in 1956, where six recruits drowned after an intoxicated instructor ordered them into swampy waters, “the drill instructor has passed from parade ground legend to parlor debate,” reported The Times. Photo: George Tames/The New York Times

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June 14, 2010 via Gwendy.

Oct. 25, 1938: Despite waging a “continuous war against slot machines and all gambling rackets,” Mayor Fiorella La Guardia wasn’t averse to betting on the Yankees over the Cubs in the 1938 World Series, with the mayor of Chicago, Edward J. Kelly. “Had Mayor La Guardia lost his wager he would have had to send Mayor Kelly a box of fine cigars,” reported The Times. “When a photographer asked the Mayor to pose as if he were eating the meat, he chucked and said: ‘What, raw meat? I may be wild, but I’...

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Feb. 17, 1975: In Phnom Penh, Cambodia, new army recruits marched in the yard. “The battle for control of the Mekong River is becoming the battle for the survival of Phnom Penh,” Sydney Schanberg of The Times reported. “The Cambodian insurgents, by laying mines in the Mekong for the first time and by digging in with heavy guns along the river banks, have sunk 19 supply vessels in the last 10 days and for the moment have effectively halted traffic on the river,” he reported, quoting the American...

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“Washington is not very strong on pageantry,” Anne O’Hare McCormick reported on the occasion of President Dwight D. Eisenhower’s and Vice President Richard M. Nixon’s inauguration on Jan. 20, 1953. “Circus” might be more apt, she wrote, noting the “twirling majorettes, the competing bands” and the “cowboys and cowgirls” present — but the ceremony ultimately had a heavy tone as Republicans took the helm for the first time in 20 years, burdened by a country whose power was at its pinnacle. “In the...

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April 12, 1967: A magazine profile of House Minority Leader Gerald Ford explains how his fitness — critical in his role as “principal legislative obstacle of the Johnson Administration” — was maintained: swimming. “The 53-year-old Congressman flings himself into his heated backdoor swimming pool before breakfast every morning except in the bitter part of winter,” reported The Times. “He swims a purposeful four laps of Australian crawl, six laps of breast stroke, four laps of back stroke, then ou...

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The Fishermen’s Bastion is reflected in the windows of a modern hotel in Budapest, October 1977.Photograph by Winfield Parks, National Geographic

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The actor Maurice Evans preparing for his role of Falstaff in Shakespeare’s “Henry IV” in 1939. “As Falstaff, Mr. Evans continues his increasing treasure of distinguished works,” raved The Times. “He is a capital fat rogue in a capital play, and the only wonder now is that ‘Henry IV’ has lain in disuse so many years.” Photo: William Eckenberg/The New York Times

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Dec. 1, 1923: The French actress Mistinguett, née Jeanne Florentine Bourgeois, photographed at home in Paris with her hundreds of fine shoes and blurry pet monkey. She had a certain flair for things ostentatious and dramatic, having reportedly had her famous legs insured in 1919 for 500,000 francs, and, according to The New York Times, challenging strangers who jostled her. “Mlle. Mistinguett, France’s most popular music hall artist, may fight a duel one day soon,” a special cable to The Times r...

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Aug. 31, 1973: A day of record-matching heat — 98 degrees — meant voltage cutbacks, deaths and, as residents were opening fire hydrants all over the city, a drop in water pressure that prompted the Water Resources commissioner to declare an emergency. Meanwhile, in Central Park, giant blocks of ice were placed on a path to provide relief. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

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July 9, 1976: “Queen Elizabeth II came to New York yesterday to make speeches, shake hands, become an honorary citizen, wave to thousands of New Yorkers — and collect 279 years’ worth of back rent,” The Times reported. “The rent, 279 peppercorns in a Steuben glass container, was paid to Her Majesty on the steps of Trinity Church, at Broadway and Wall Street. The church received its charter from William III, an ancestor of the Queen, in 1697, for a nominal yearly rent of one peppercorn. Until tod...

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René Burri: The Kaiser-Wilhem-Gedachtniskirche (the Kaiser Wilhem Memorial Church) bombed during the war and never restored. West Berlin, 1959. 

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July 30, 1956: After the Stockholm, a Swedish liner, collided with the Andrea Dorea, an Italian cruise liner, killing 51, the damaged ship was dry-docked for repairs while its only Spanish seaman visited Linda Morgan, a 14-year-old American girl he rescued who spoke Spanish and was initially reported dead. In the crash, she had been “transferred from her berth on the Italian liner by the twisted steel of Stockholm.” Photo: Carl Gossett/The New York Times

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Man testing early television equipment in New York, 1959.Photograph by Willard Culver, National Geographic

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October 16, 1971: Sea vessels both huge and minuscule passed each other in New York harbor in the lead-up to the Mayor’s Cup schooner race. The enormous ship at the left and the tiny one in the middle did not compete (schooners have two or more masts) in the competition, which is held in October for its brisk winds and clear air. “Today did not oblige,” reported The Times. “For those in the spectator fleet, the full length of the starting line was barely visible through the fog.“ Photo: Li...

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December 3, 2014

March 22, 1965: A friendly lioness cub at the A.S.P.C.A. shelter on Beech Street in Manhattan was eventually claimed by the Trefflich Bird and Animal Company, The Times reported in a brief article with the headline, “Lion, Taken for Stroll, Lands in Jail.” Roy F. Thorpe, a 27-year-old trucker and student, was given a summons for “violating the health code by having a wild animal in the streets.” Photo: Allyn Baum/The New York Times

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Dennis Stock: Grace Kelly and Frank Sinatra during the shooting of the film High Society, Directed by Charles Walters. Hollywood, 1956.

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Verdi’s opera Aida enthralls a packed house in New York City, July 1964.Photograph by Albert Moldvay, National Geographic

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A bright orange river of sparks cascades from a high cliff in Yosemite National Park, May 1958.Photograph by J. Baylor Roberts, National Geographic

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Aug. 7, 1980: Mother Teresa prayed at St. Rita’s Roman Catholic Church in the South Bronx, her first visit to the United States as a Nobel Peace laureate. “Let us thank God for our people, the poor people,” she said at a newly opened soup kitchen there, which she blessed. “They have given us much more than we have given to them. Let us continue to love God in the poor.” Her stay was largely kept private, reported The Times. “ ‘We didn’t tell anybody,’ said Sister Priscilla, who is in charge of t...

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July 14, 1935: Connecting Manhattan, Queens and the Bronx, the Triborough Bridge — now officially the Robert F. Kennedy Bridge — was one of the larger public works of the Great Depression. Its construction was started on Black Friday in 1929, and it was opened by Robert Moses almost a year after this picture was taken. Photo: The New York Times

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May 11, 1929: An international Rhönrad contest in Würzberg, Germany. The Rhönrad, or German wheel, was invented in 1925 and apparently shown at the 1936 Berlin Olympics, but was not entered as an official sport. Photo: The New York Times

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